Rentals Using Novel Construction Available Soon

By Susan Bailey

Earlier this year Baileywick Properties pioneered the use of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels for small apartment construction.  CLTs have been used in a handful of larger projects in Portland, but this is believed to be a first for a small project where construction costs are critical.  In this case, they were used to speed the building process and reduce the disruption of neighbors. (see the picture of the first week’s construction).

Continue reading Rentals Using Novel Construction Available Soon

New Fundraiser at TwentySix Cafe 1/1/21 plus Knott Street Boxing Gets a Big Surprise from Les Schwab

Help out the Knott Street Boxing Club on January 1st from 7 am – 1 pm, at TwentySix Cafe at 2723 NE 7th Avenue
just north of Knott Street

In our fall issue, we reported on the Knott Street Boxing Club that normally works out at the Matt Dishman Community Center. However, because of Covid, the center is closed and the boxing club had to relocate for its workouts and training sessions. Stanley Dunn, both trainer and mentor, has dedicated numerous hours to the kids that are part of the club. They are now training at the Vancouver Avenue side of Dawson Park in the covered area.

The Knott Street Boxing Club has been around for a long time. According to its Facebook page, “It was once a top boxing club in the nation and produced championship level fighters. It has remained a solid community club in a neighborhood that has gone through a lot of changes. Boxing gyms are often recognized for helping to keep kids out of trouble by giving them a place to go and teaching them the value of discipline and hard work.”

Currently, the club needs equipment like a heavy bag and is saving up for a van to transport equipment to the park and drive the boxers to tournaments when they are able to participate in those events again. There is a new Go Fund Me page to make donations and any amount is greatly appreciated.

The kids at Knott Street Boxing Club training at Matt Dishman Park. Photo is a screenshot from the video link below.

One day this fall, the club, and also Stanley, got a big surprise. A film crew and reporter from KPTV were interviewing Stanley about the club and, unbeknownst to him, this was more than just an interview. The Les Schwab Surprise Squad arrived on the scene and presented the Knott Street Boxing Club with some much-needed equipment and a check for $2000. Stanley was so surprised and grateful. Check out the video here.

Hopefully, with the help of Portland residents, that van that they are saving up for will be acquired in the not too distant future.

You can help out now! On January 1st from 7 am – 1 pm TwentySix Cafe is holding a fundraiser for the Knott Street Boxing Club. Stop by, grab a coffee or tea and chip in to help out the club and the kids.

Thai MLK—New Food Cart Next to Billy Ray’s Tavern

There’s a new food cart in town located on MLK at Sacramento and it sits right next to Billy Ray’s Tavern at 2210 NE MLK.

Thai MLK is a great new food cart on MLK at Sacramento. Julie Wilson, owner, shows off their extensive menu.
Photo courtesy Julie Wilson

Julie and Brandon Wilson have opened Thai MLK and the patrons of Billy Ray’s Tavern are, I’m sure, happy to have food that can be purchased at the cart and then consumed at the Tavern.

Julie Wilson moved here from Hawaii after working with her auntie who had a restaurant in Kauai, Hawaii. She learned how to make delicious Thai cuisine. Her sister owns a restaurant in Troutdale, Thai Carnation, so it’s no wonder that Julie would accept the offer to buy the food cart that used to be owned by her sister.

The menu at Thai MLK has a nice variety of appetizers, salads, stir fry, noodles, soups, and curries as well as beverages and desserts. Main dishes range from $9-10 and appetizers are $5-7.

Crab Puffs – just one of the delicious options at the Thai MLK food cart. Photo courtesy Julie Wilson

At this point they accept cash but also accept credit cards. Conveniently, there is an ATM at Billy Ray’s Tavern that can be easily accessed during the bar’s business hours.

As a bonus, Thai MLK is giving away free masks so you won’t have to worry if you order your food and then decide to go next door to the tavern.

Soon the Wilsons plan to build a patio next to the food cart to protect customers from the rain which will definitely be appreciated.

Thai MLK is open Tuesday—Saturday from 1—10 pm.  Be sure to try this food cart soon and welcome Julie and Brandon to the neighborhood. From personal experience, the food is delicious and I highly recommend the Pad Thai. It is so flavorful and you can increase the spice with the additional chili peppers included on the side.

We are happy to have them in Eliot!

Community Flu Shot Clinics

From Legacy Health

We’re making it easy to protect your family and community from the seasonal flu. While supplies last, we’re offering free flu shots at select Legacy locations in Oregon and Southwest Washington. The vaccine is even more important this year with the COVID-19 pandemic.

It’s especially important for children to get vaccinated, even though they are not physically in school, because this group tends to be largest transmitters of the flu. The annual flu shot is the greatest defense against this yearly infection. These flu clinics are providing flu shots for anyone aged six months and older. No payment or insurance is required.

Our staff follows all necessary safety precautions to ensure you and your family can safely get your flu shot. You can also visit one of our two drive-thru location to get your shot in the comfort of your vehicle. Locations and details listed below. 

Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center
11/3 & 11/10
1pm – 7pm | Main Lobby
2211 NE 139th Street,
Vancouver, WA 98686

Legacy Medical Group
Family Wellness Clinic
11/6
1pm – 7pm | Drive Thru
1000 S.E Tech Center Drive, #120,
Vancouver, WA 98683

Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center
11/7 & 11/14
1pm – 7pm | Cascade Classroom
Cascade Building Sleep Center
24700 S.E Stark Street,
Gresham, OR 97030

Legacy Emanuel Medical Center
11/6 & 11/13
1pm – 7pm | Conf. Rm East / West
Medical Office Building 2
501 N. Graham Street,
Portland, OR 97227

Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center
11/4 & 11/11
1pm – 7pm | Drive Thru
Overton Parking Garage
2145 N.W. Overton Ave,
Portland, OR 97210

Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center
11/2 & 11/9
1pm – 7pm | Rm 117
Health Education Center
19300 S.W. 65th Ave,
Tualatin, OR 97062

Legacy Silverton Medical Center
11/4 & 11/12
1pm – 7pm | 1st Flr Lobby
Family Birth Center
342 Fairview Street,
Silverton, Oregon 97381

Legacy Holladay Park Campus
11/5 & 11/12
1pm – 7pm | Lab Conf. Rm
1225 NE 2nd Ave
Portland, OR 97232

What Do I Need to Know About the Portland City Charter?

The City of Portland uses a foundational document, known as the City Charter, as a guide to how the city should be governed (similarly to the way the US relies on the Constitution). Portland’s charter requires that the document be reviewed and updated at least once per decade. It’s time for just such a review and the city is kicking off the process now.

The Charter Review Commission has an opportunity to examine the way the existing charter works, including how the government operates, how officials are elected, and how the government is structured. The commission determines its own scope and sets its own timeline. The City of Portland oversees the selection of 20 Portland residents to form the commission and has vocally committed to creating an inclusive commission that is representative of Portland’s demographics (as well as the city’s geography). Each city commissioner selects four Portland residents to serve, including the mayor, for a total of 20.

Due to COVID-19, the Charter Review Commission will meet virtually. Commission members will receive a stipend of $500 in place of childcare, food, and transportation they would have received under normal circumstances. Commission members should expect the process to last for 18 to 24 months.

Several key issues are expected to come up during the commission’s review process:

  • Portland’s form of government: Portland is one of the few remaining cities using a commission-style government. Portland City Club published a report in 2019 (https://www.pdxcityclub.org/new-government/) on the inequities of commission-style governments and our need to adopt a more inclusive form of government. In the report, they directly connect the incredibly low numbers of women (9) and people of color (3) elected to the local use of a commission-based government. JoAnn Hardesty, elected in 2018, is the first woman of color to be elected to Portland’s city government. 
  • The City Auditor’s office: While Portland’s City Auditor is independently elected, the city charter grants control of the auditor’s budget to the city council, effectively allowing the city council to limit the power of the city auditor. Given that the auditor’s job is to examine the city council’s work and report back on the results to the people of Portland, the current city auditor, Mary Hull Caballero has concerns about that control. The city council asked that the Charter Review Commission examine the question.
  • Policing and community safety: The city charter sets expectations for public safety and could be used as an avenue to address defunding police, as well as implementing new approaches to public safety in Portland. 
  • Election reform and security: As other cities have adopted ranked-choice voting and other reforms through ballot measures, the city charter review process offers an alternative opportunity to explore municipal election reform. Furthermore, during the primary, the incumbent mayor and police commissioner, Ted Wheeler, accepted donations significantly larger than those allowed by the city charter.
  • Neighborhood associations: Portland’s neighborhood associations wield significant power and are primarily composed of affluent White home owners. The past few years have seen major critiques of these neighborhood associations as well as the Office of Community and Civic Life (formerly the Office of Neighborhood Involvement), which oversees the associations.
  • Prosper Portland: Previously known as the Portland Development Corporation, Prosper Portland’s existence is based on the city charter. The organization is responsible for a variety of so-called “urban renewal” projects that have gutted Black communities and stolen Black wealth in Portland, as well as displacing other communities.

Critics of the charter review process do suggest that city commissioners can prevent meaningful action by the Charter Review Commission, because they can vote to block the commission’s recommendations from taking effect. During the last charter review, in 2011, the commission pushed for the adoption of a new form of city government, but were largely ignored by the then-mayor and city council. The Charter Review Commission can choose to send recommendations directly to voters, provided 75 percent or more of the commission members agree to do so.

While the Charter Review Commission’s power is limited, there are arguments for participating in the process: commission members are empowered to investigate the way the City of Portland conducts business, which could help all residents of Portland better understand whether elected officials truly are working on our behalf. The city council may feel more pressure to listen to residents during these times of heightened attention on police forces and governments. And if city commissioners don’t listen to the Charter Review Commission? Portlanders know how to throw a good protest.

Tentative Timeline

  • June 30, 2020 — Charter Review Commission Work Session -read notes from the work session here. (https://www.portland.gov/omf/charter-review-commission/events/2020/6/30/charter-review-commission-work-session)
  • Fall 2020 — The City of Portland appoints Charter Review Commission members
  • Winter 2020 — The Charter Review Commission develops a work plan, including community engagement strategy and procedures
  • Early 2021 — The Charter Review Commission meets with community members to gather feedback.
  • Late 2021 — The Charter Review Commission provides an initial report to the Portland City Council.
  • January 2022 — The Charter Review Commission provides recommendations to the Portland City Council.
  • Spring 2022 — The Charter Review Commission and the City of Portland determine if changes to the charter must be voted on as ballot measures before implementation.

Additional Resources

Compiled by Thursday Bram. Please contact @ThursdayB on Twitter with comments, questions, and concerns. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. If you’re interested in using this information to create a more visually-oriented explainer, please contact Thursday!

You Can Still Chat with Senator Lew Frederick

By Nathan Soltz

The regular Senator Frederick’s Second Saturday Chats have been held virtually since March. They’re still the second Saturday of every month at 9 am, but they are live-streamed on Senator Frederick’s Facebook page: facebook.com/SenLewFrederick. The format is the same as it would be in-person. Senator Frederick gives his updates and then answers any questions from people watching. They ask their questions by typing in the chat and then they are relayed to Lew.

Please feel free to sign up to join our mailing list at oregonlegislature.gov/frederick (e-Subscribe at top right of page). We send out reminders every week before the chat and also post one on Facebook.

We’ve had a pretty good turnout, getting about 40 people each time and lots of views afterward as well (we post the live stream recording as soon as it’s over). They go about 40 minutes to an hour, ending when we’re out of questions.

For more information or questions contact Nathan Joseph Soltz, Chief of Staff, Senator Lew Frederick, 900 Court St. NE, S-419, Salem, OR 97301, (503) 986-1722 (Office)

The ABC’s of Food Pantry Donations and Harvey Roberts Pantry Story

Food pantry at 3617 NE 7th Avenue organized by Harvey Roberts.
Photo courtesy PDX Free Fridge.

It started with having a lot of extra time and energy and nowhere to use it. Being out of work, stuck at home, feeling the need to help those struggling with food insecurity, one Portland resident wanted to help her community.

An idea was born a couple of months ago and Harvey Roberts wanted to make it come to fruition. The small food pantry now in the parking strip in front of her house just a block and a half north of Fremont Street at 3617 NE 7th Ave was transformed from more than just a daydream into a real lifesaver for nearby neighbors and houseless residents.

Harvey was living in Columbus, Ohio, and wanted to be part of a larger LGBTQ community. She identifies as queer and as she said, “There were only 7 queers in Columbus and I had dated all of them.” She is also a social worker by trade and wanted to move to a city that offered more social services.

Enter Portland, Oregon.

Portland was a perfect fit for Harvey and she got connected quickly. She has only been here 5 years but has been able to work with several grassroots organizations providing mutual aid through yard sales and other fundraisers with money going to the Black community members.

Her work experience has been with the houseless and survivors of domestic violence so she has experience with those that are vulnerable and needing assistance and services.

After purchasing a reasonably priced pantry from a neighbor, Harvey filled up the pantry with food and toiletries and placed it in the parking strip in front of her home. She added hand sanitizer, a mini-fridge, and a box with grocery bags for ease of carrying away food and supplies. A friend of hers was working with PDX Free Fridge and linked Harvey up with the organization. They listed her pantry on their food pantry map and also, at no cost to her,  built a structure to house the pantry to keep it weather-resistant this winter. It has been a great partnership.


Harvey has met a lot of the people that access the pantry. Houseless residents, seniors needing additional food, neighbors with large families that need to supplement their meals, and those needing toiletries that the SNAP funds don’t cover. It is heartwarming to see how many she has helped but sad to see how many need help.

How can others help out? What’s the best way to give?  What’s most needed?

It’s simple. When going to the store, buy extra of what you already are purchasing or buy additional items the pantry could use. Next, drop your food or toiletry donations by the pantry or leave them on the porch if the pantry is full. Harvey restocks and organizes the pantry daily to make sure there are a variety of items available.

The best items to donate are soups, tuna or other canned food with PULL TOP lids, beef jerky, applesauce, peanut butter, sardines, crackers, bread, produce, and other items that don’t need to be cooked for very long. She suggests not donating dry beans or rice. It is nice to have access to foods you want to eat not just the same items over and over again.

Toiletries are also in high demand. Toilet paper, razors, toothbrushes, toothpaste, mouthwash, dental floss, menstrual products, and soap are needed.

Be mindful and intentional and donate what you would like to eat or use. Monetary donations are also accepted. See below for payment app account information and also contact information or stop by and say hi to Harvey if you have more questions or need suggestions for donations.

So let’s come together, give what you can and take what you need. We’ll all be better because of it.

  • Harvey Roberts
  • 3617 NE 7th Ave
  • harveyjeanroberts88@gmail.com
  • Cash App $payharveymoney
  • Venmo App @harveymoney
  • (Please type PANTRY in the memo line of Cash or Venmo donation)

Within and Beyond the Borders of Eliot: Community Resources

The Hand Up Project is a non-profit organization working to break the cycle of homelessness.  According to their website, they are offering pantry locations addressing increased food insecurities in communities of color and the LGBTQ community. They also offer peer support and insurance navigation and are a member of the Northwest Community Network Referral Network. They offer a shopping style food pantry at the Q Center (4115 N Mississippi) the 2nd and 4th Mondays from 12-4 pm and also at St. Philip the Deacon church (120 N Knott) every Tuesday from 12-4 pm. Check out their website at HandUpProject.org.

St. Philip the Deacon church has hosted a Saturday lunch at Deacon’s Dining Hall for over 20 years. They have served over 200 hot meals a week. Currently, the free Saturday lunch program is still operating just under different terms. You can pick up a sack lunch at 12:30 pm every Saturday at the church dining hall. For more information contact the church at StPhiliptheDeacon.org  or call 503-281-5802

PDX Free Fridge is a new community organization that has organized the creation of street-side pantries. Their motto is “a project by the community, for the community” available 24/7 to “take what you need, leave what you can” and “increase food access for all”.

There are two pantries close enough for our residents here in Eliot. One is actually in Eliot at Open Signal at the corner of MLK and Graham. The full-size refrigerator has food available for the taking and also for contributions.

The other pantry is located at 3617 NE 7th Avenue  north of Fremont just south of Beech St. Harvey Roberts  organized this pantry and has linked in with PDX Free Fridge. This pantry offers some refrigerated items, meals that do not require a kitchen and also some toiletry items. See the article about Harvey Roberts who started this pantry to find out more and how this pantry got started and how best to contribute to the pantries. 

Oregon Food Bank is usually only associated with food pantries, but they have organized a page on their website with options for food plus a full range of resources from help with your rent, childcare, health services, and more. The information can be found on the Oregon Food Bank website.

Multnomah County has curated an extensive list of services with contact information ranging from addiction and recovery services to mental health services, legal, and employment assistance. Click here for the Multnomah County Resource List.

Nextdoor is the neighborhood social media platform that works also like a bulletin board or classified ad site. Their website states, “It’s where communities come together to greet newcomers, exchange recommendations, and read the latest local news. Where neighbors support local businesses and get updates from public agencies. Where neighbors borrow tools and sell couches. It’s how to get the most out of everything nearby.” Find free items, get help with a project, make new friends, and connect with your neighborhood at https://nextdoor.com/.

Irving Park Nature Patch – Calling for Volunteers

From Portland Parks and Recreation website edited for clarity

Irving Park at the east side of Eliot neighborhood with sports fields, a dog park, playground and now an opportunity to make the park better for everyone. Photo credit Sue Stringer

Portland Parks & Recreation and the Bureau of Environmental Services are collaborating at Irving Park to create nature patches and rain gardens that will capture rainwater, foster habitat for wildlife, and add natural features for you to enjoy.

This project will bring nature to the neighborhood that works to protect public health and the environment by helping prevent flooding, sewer backups into basements, and overflows into the Willamette River during heavy rain. 

Areas targeted for nature patch landscaping include the degraded slopes around the basketball courts and between the dog-off-leash-area and the picnic areas. View the design concept here.

While the rain gardens are currently in the early design phase, landscaping to create the nature patches will begin this fall and planting will take place over next winter.

To sign up to volunteer to help create this space click here.

For more information about this project and other nature patches around the city visit the city website’s Nature Patch page.

The Irving Park Nature Patch is funded through the BES Percent for Green Program.

Cartside PDX– Tap House and More Carts Now Open for Business

We reported in the summer issue that a new food cart pod had opened on N Williams and Hancock. At that time only a couple of carts were open and we were anxiously awaiting more carts and also the tap house to start serving. Well, that time has come. Each have different hours so check them out or give them a call.  They are all listed in the Dining in Eliot list to the right. Check out their website for more information and menus at  https://www.cartsidepdx.com/

Lots of options at Cartside the new food cart pod on N Williams at NE Hancock

The following carts have joined the pod:

  • L’Unico Italian Street Food
  • Poblano Pepper Mexican Food
  • Yaba Yabaa Mediterranean
  • Ko Sisters Korean Soul Food
  • Let’s Roll Sushi PDX
  • Smaaken Waffle Sandwiches
  • PP Thai Food Cart

The Cartside Tap House is also now open 7 days a week from 11:30 am —7:00 pm and serving up beer, cider and wine with 25 different beers and ciders on tap.

Check them all out-  there’s lots of great food and drink to enjoy!

Boise Eliot Native Grove Update

By Andrine de la Rocha

Hello, Grove Friends!

Here in our third summer, the Grove is looking incredibly lush. As the shrubs grow to fill (and overfill!) their allotted areas, the vegetative contours of the Grove are starting to really look the way we imagined them when we first began. The Willow Dome is rebounding well from the bizarre massive water-main flood of last summer, and we seem to be attracting not just bees but dragonflies and birds of many species. Thank you so much for all your incredible help in making our dream a reality.

Now we’re thinking about a few equipment upgrades, and hope y’all might be able to kick in a little financial support.  

When we first began watering the Grove, we dragged our expensive hose across the street and discovered that auto traffic ruptured and destroyed the unprotected hose.  For the last couple of years, we’ve protected the hose with four 2” x 12” boards which are huge and heavy (as our Watering Heroes can attest to). They’ve done a great job, but are splintering, cracking, and breaking under the stress.

We’d need some actual hose ramps to protect them, which should both a) do a better job, b) last longer, and c) be much easier to drag out into the street and back. The ones we looked at are black rubber with a bright yellow lid, rated for 20-30 tons per axle, which should stand up even to the garbage and delivery trucks that occasionally traverse the hose.

Six 3’4” pieces, at $46 each, – 8% bulk discount, free shipping, = $254. 

The tripod for our sprinkler has done good service, but one of the legs is broken: the clip that holds it in extended position no longer works. Replacement tripod = $40

We also need a couple of bags of concrete to set the ceramic bird/bee bath in place, AND one of our really good hoses just broke at the hose bib last week and needed a repair kit = $19 which brings us up to a total of about: $325.

It would help so much if you felt comfortable with tossing a few (or a lot of) bucks at the project. Please use https://www.patreon.com/BoiseEliotNativeGrove to become a monthly Patron and/or make single donations through our PayPal account here: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/NativeGrovePDX

There are about 150 people on our email list at this time, so if each of you threw say $3-5 at us, we could cover these costs. If you want to give more or cover the entire cost, we’ll name the hose ramps after you, and sing your praises every time we water the Grove. On the other hand, if you are willing to set up a monthly payment with a shout-out and adopt-a-plant perks, click on the Patreon link here:  https://www.patreon.com/BoiseEliotNativeGrove

Our Patreon and PayPal launch has so far attracted ELEVEN brave contributors who will have trees, shrubberies, and bee-hotel rooms named after them!

We’ve met several of our goals with these pioneer patrons and as such will be able to 1) purchase new bee-straws for the bee hotel, 2) purchase supplies to fix the hexagonal bench and install the birdbath, and 3) help pay for the water to keep the trees and plants alive! As those first funds arrive, we’ll get those things on the schedule. Until then, keep spreading the word and saving the world.

Also! Please share these links and tell people about the Grove and come visit and take pictures and post them and tag us and just help people find out about us and enjoy this miraculous place we’ve created together.

Thanks as ever for your ongoing support, physically, emotionally, spiritually, financially, and psychically. We hope to see you soon in the Grove (all masked up) and in the World (safe and distanced), and in the Streets (don’t forget to Vote!)

Much Love,

Andrine & Howard

P.S. Full disclosure: we were able to borrow the funds to purchase the hose ramps, and we’d like to pay that back to the generous person who fronted us the funds.

Boise Eliot Native Grove

~300 N Ivy St  PDX OR

fb: BoiseEliotNativeGrove

ig: @BoiseEliotNativeGrove

https://www.nativegrovepdx.org/