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Eliot Neighborhood Association Board Meeting Agenda 1/25/2021 7:00pm

Incoming co-Chairs: Jimmy Wilson and Allan Rudwick

Monday, January 25 7:00-8:30pm

Join Zoom Meeting (phone instructions at bottom)

Agenda:

1. Welcome & Introductions (7:00pm)

2. agenda additions?

3. Gladys McCoy Memorial Garden letter – MOTION: send letter of support?

4. discuss/ MOTION to approve signers on our bank account (Sue, Jimmy, Allan)

5. MOTION: sign on to clean air letters from around the city

6. Committee updates

a) stanton Street / Dawson Park livability update 

b) Land Use Update

c) Eliot News Spring Edition 

d) other updates

7. public comment

8. MOTION: Approve November Meeting Minutes

Adjourn


please join by phone if you have connection issues

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Meeting ID: 999 6671 7504
Passcode: 138062
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/aehJumsFj2

New Fundraiser at TwentySix Cafe 1/1/21 plus Knott Street Boxing Gets a Big Surprise from Les Schwab

Help out the Knott Street Boxing Club on January 1st from 7 am – 1 pm, at TwentySix Cafe at 2723 NE 7th Avenue
just north of Knott Street

In our fall issue, we reported on the Knott Street Boxing Club that normally works out at the Matt Dishman Community Center. However, because of Covid, the center is closed and the boxing club had to relocate for its workouts and training sessions. Stanley Dunn, both trainer and mentor, has dedicated numerous hours to the kids that are part of the club. They are now training at the Vancouver Avenue side of Dawson Park in the covered area.

The Knott Street Boxing Club has been around for a long time. According to its Facebook page, “It was once a top boxing club in the nation and produced championship level fighters. It has remained a solid community club in a neighborhood that has gone through a lot of changes. Boxing gyms are often recognized for helping to keep kids out of trouble by giving them a place to go and teaching them the value of discipline and hard work.”

Currently, the club needs equipment like a heavy bag and is saving up for a van to transport equipment to the park and drive the boxers to tournaments when they are able to participate in those events again. There is a new Go Fund Me page to make donations and any amount is greatly appreciated.

The kids at Knott Street Boxing Club training at Matt Dishman Park. Photo is a screenshot from the video link below.

One day this fall, the club, and also Stanley, got a big surprise. A film crew and reporter from KPTV were interviewing Stanley about the club and, unbeknownst to him, this was more than just an interview. The Les Schwab Surprise Squad arrived on the scene and presented the Knott Street Boxing Club with some much-needed equipment and a check for $2000. Stanley was so surprised and grateful. Check out the video here.

Hopefully, with the help of Portland residents, that van that they are saving up for will be acquired in the not too distant future.

You can help out now! On January 1st from 7 am – 1 pm TwentySix Cafe is holding a fundraiser for the Knott Street Boxing Club. Stop by, grab a coffee or tea and chip in to help out the club and the kids.

Eliot Neighborhood Association Board Meeting Minutes 10/19/20

Board Members Present:

  • Allan Rudwick, Co-Chair
  • Jennifer Wilcox
  • Sue Stringer, Newsletter Editor
  • Shireen Hasan, Community Outreach
  • Jimmy Wilson, Co-Chair
  • Pat Montgomery

Others Present:

  • Kelli Fagan
  • Alexis Croucher
  • William Van Hevelingen
  • Harrison Osbourn
  • Craig D
  • Kim
  • John Engleheart
  • Emma Holland
  • Jell Morgan
  • Jared Hobbs
  • Esme Harbour
  • Angela Kramer

Meeting opened at 6:34 pm.

Welcome & Introductions

Neighborhood Update

Dawson Park: met with the police over Zoom.  They said they were not aware of the magnitude of the problems at the park.  Officer Quackenbush (LT Jim Quackenbush  James.Quakenbush@portlandoregon.gov  503-793-9681) came by the next day and saw firsthand what was going on.  Since then people have not noticed police presence.  Will meet with the police again in two weeks. It was suggested that now is the time to get working on a solution so that when the weather gets better again we will have a solution in place.  It was noted that Central City Concern has been in the neighborhood quite a bit trying to engage the people using drugs. 

Can use pdxreporter.org  to report crime.  This is part of the city government and may be easier than waiting on hold on the non-emergency line.  

Some questions that were raised included:

  • What can we do proactively?  
  • What are our hopes?
  • Could we have the hospital invite some folks to put a food cart there?
  • What are the next steps up the chain:
    • NECN Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods 
    • PSAT Public Safety 
    • ONI Office of Neighborhood Involvement

It was suggested that we should have a representative from Emanuel on the board.  That was an agreement made in the past. There has not been an Emanuel representative in over a year.

Board Elections – Choose Directors for the Coming year

There was a brief discussion of the role of a director.  The role includes attending meetings regularly and doing some work between meetings (small tasks such as write letters, articles for newsletter)

Allan reviewed the process: We will open for nominations, develop a slate, then vote in the slate.  Then next month we will elect the officers. People can nominate themselves or anyone else.  

Allan re-nominated all those currently on the board: Allan, Jimmy, Shireen, Pat, Jennifer, Sue

Johnny Engleheart nominated himself, Allan seconded

Harrison Osbourn nominated himself, 

Kelli Fagan was suggested but declined but is interested in the livability committee.

The slate (Allan Rudwick, Jimmy Wilson, Shireen Hasan, Pat Montgomery, Sue Stringer, Jennifer Wilcox,   Johnny Engleheart, and Harrison Osbourn) was unanimously elected. 

Jimmy made a statement that we need to have a level playing field that need to be addressed before we bring new people into the board.  In the past, there has been new leader training for new board members.

Pat recommended that the executive committee review Angela’s proposal for racial justice and diversity training and make a recommendation to the full board. 

Old Business/Updates  

Land Use committee met last week.  The city is slightly changing the conservation district rules. They are being more flexible in how the houses can be used so that they will be used more and be less likely to be demolished.  

Newsletter went out and looks great.  Sue is open to people writing articles because she is down writers.  She is hoping to connect with some high school students to get a youthful perspective. 

Clean Air Team: Sue and Allan contacted everyone and heard back from some people.  Most people were not able to participate at this time. Allan was going to send the letter to XPO Logistics but realized that the letter was not ready to send.  It is unclear what we really want to ask for in this letter. The committee needs to meet to hammer out the details. Angela will do some research on community partners in the schools and try to connect them to Allan or Sue. After some discussion, it was decided that we will ask XPO logistics to filter their trucks.    

Approve amended minutes from September’s meeting

Sue moved to approve the minutes as amended.  Passed unanimously. 

Meeting adjourned 8:17pm

Adopt a Block Update: 26 and Counting… Can We Count You In?

By Jody Guth

PickUpTrash
Keep the Neighborhood Clean!

The Eliot adopt-a-block program is currently 26 members strong.  A few folks have moved, and busy schedules have put others on hold (to resume later, they promised!) However, we’ve added several new members in the last couple months, and the solve bags and disposable gloves I have stacked on my porch have started to dwindle – a good thing!  I’m committed to keeping those supplies stocked and am hoping other Eliot neighbors might wish to join our caring group of clean-street-defenders.  Please contact me, Jody, at 503-331-1511 (land line) and I’ll get you set up, and tell you everything you need to know. (regarding trash, that is….) My email address is jodyguth@gmail.com. 

 For those wanting to join but not quite ready to commit, there is also a way for you to help out.  Metro has a program called RID Patrol.  All you need is a phone or computer, and a few minutes of your time to report any illegally dumped items in the public right of way. Their contact info is oregonmetro.gov and their phone number is 503-234-3000 option 6. If reporting online, go to the search bar and type in rid. There is a wealth of information for you there. See a dumped mattress, appliance, large bags of illegally dumped trash, etc.,  just contact RID and they will have someone out to pick it up.  How cool is that?

Of course, we still need our feet-on-the-street citizens to tackle the cigarette butt’s, (no, they don’t degrade) fast food beverage cups and wrappers, and so many other bits of flotsam and jetsam swirling about our neighborhood streets. This is where a committed adopt-a-blocker (maybe you?) comes in. We’d love to have you join us. Oh, and there is a bonus. We have a quarterly drawing for one lucky member to receive a $100 New Season’s gift certificate compliments of our Eliot Neighborhood Association. I have picked 2 winners this time around as there had been some adjusting and uncertainty the past quarter.  Congratulations to Jan Landis, and Cindy Irvine! Couldn’t have happened to two more committed members.  Jan patrols the area around Boise Eliot school (and mentions she could use more help in that area!) and Cindy tackles Cook St between Rodney and MLK. She has also mentioned being overwhelmed on that street, especially closer to MLK. If anyone living in either of those areas would like to join/help I know both women would appreciate it.  

Cleaning up leaves from storm drains are just one thing that volunteers for Adopt-a-Block can help with. Photo credit Sue Stringer

Summer’s almost over and the fall rains will soon begin. (don’t think I’ve ever been so anxious for THAT to start happening). Going forward, please do your best to keep your leaves from blocking sewer drains. Those who live on corners where the leaves flow down to them will be appreciative of any efforts “upstream”. Be kind, and consider your neighbors. Other bits of trash also get strewn about in the mix and keeping things clear makes it so much easier for adopt-a blockers to do their jobs without having to pick through heavy, wet piles of leaves.  Come on along….make keeping YOUR Eliot neighborhood clean a part of your good deeds. We look forward to having you join us.

Slow Streets for Cyclists and Pedestrians

By Monique Gaskins

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/76829 Link for Tillimook Improvement Project

Autumn is upon us! As the summer temperatures start falling and the days continue getting shorter, here is your friendly reminder to keep or start spending time outside. Especially with the limitations of Covid-19, being able to maintain social distancing while also running, walking, or bicycling can be helpful to mental and physical well-being. Although all of us might not have easy access to parks or gyms right now, we do have access to some innovative use of our city streets. Eliot holds at least two major greenways (Tillamook and Rodney) and is adjacent to at least two more (Siskiyou and Going). 

The Portland Bureau of Transportation, PBOT, launched a new initiative, Safe Streets, during Covid-19 that encourages Portlanders who are not in an automobile to stop limiting their usage to the sidewalk on some of our local roads. The goals of this program are as follows: 

1) Facilitate access to more outdoor space

2) Enable walkers, runners, and bicycles to maintain social distance while using city streets and sidewalks (Also called Slow Streets)

3) Provide more options for businesses to allow social distance

Here is a written response to a couple of questions from PBOT’s Communications, John Brady: 

MG: How does the city see Safe Streets? Successful? Not?

JB: So far, the Slow Streets program is helping keep traffic volumes and speeds low on the neighborhood greenway network. In addition, nearly 800 calls and emails to the city’s 823-SAFE line have been overwhelmingly positive with many people requesting additional or specific locations for Slow Street installations.

MG: Are there any plans to improve Rodney, Going, or Tillamook Greenways in the near future?

JB: NE Tillamook just completed a capital improvement project that improved crossings and reduced speeds along the neighborhood greenway from N Flint to NE 28th. We are in the planning stages for the next phase of the project from NE 28th to NE 62nd. NE Rodney and NE Going are not in line for construction projects in the near future.

Within the Eliot neighborhood, Northeast Rodney Avenue and Northeast Tillamook Street both fall under the Slow Streets program. Since the initiative kicked off earlier this year, I’ve enjoyed more space to run and bicycle without worrying about being limited to the space of a sidewalk. So, consider this an open invitation to all of our neighbors: I hope to see you getting some fresh air on the neighborhood greenways! 

Thai MLK—New Food Cart Next to Billy Ray’s Tavern

There’s a new food cart in town located on MLK at Sacramento and it sits right next to Billy Ray’s Tavern at 2210 NE MLK.

Thai MLK is a great new food cart on MLK at Sacramento. Julie Wilson, owner, shows off their extensive menu.
Photo courtesy Julie Wilson

Julie and Brandon Wilson have opened Thai MLK and the patrons of Billy Ray’s Tavern are, I’m sure, happy to have food that can be purchased at the cart and then consumed at the Tavern.

Julie Wilson moved here from Hawaii after working with her auntie who had a restaurant in Kauai, Hawaii. She learned how to make delicious Thai cuisine. Her sister owns a restaurant in Troutdale, Thai Carnation, so it’s no wonder that Julie would accept the offer to buy the food cart that used to be owned by her sister.

The menu at Thai MLK has a nice variety of appetizers, salads, stir fry, noodles, soups, and curries as well as beverages and desserts. Main dishes range from $9-10 and appetizers are $5-7.

Crab Puffs – just one of the delicious options at the Thai MLK food cart. Photo courtesy Julie Wilson

At this point they accept cash but also accept credit cards. Conveniently, there is an ATM at Billy Ray’s Tavern that can be easily accessed during the bar’s business hours.

As a bonus, Thai MLK is giving away free masks so you won’t have to worry if you order your food and then decide to go next door to the tavern.

Soon the Wilsons plan to build a patio next to the food cart to protect customers from the rain which will definitely be appreciated.

Thai MLK is open Tuesday—Saturday from 1—10 pm.  Be sure to try this food cart soon and welcome Julie and Brandon to the neighborhood. From personal experience, the food is delicious and I highly recommend the Pad Thai. It is so flavorful and you can increase the spice with the additional chili peppers included on the side.

We are happy to have them in Eliot!

Memorial Garden for Oregon’s First Black Politician

By Ruth Eddy

The Gladys McCoy Memorial on MLK and Knott. Photo credit Sue Stringer

At the busy intersection of Knott and Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, a small semi-circle of grass with a few roses gives a break to the surrounding concrete. At the center of a faded, red brick wall is a portrait of Gladys Sims McCoy etched in stone, with wafted hair and bright eyes watching over passersby. McCoys’s smiling face is surrounded by an engraved list of her accomplishments, as well as the mindless graffiti tags familiar to underappreciated spaces of a city. 

McCoy’s accomplishments were many. She was the first African American elected to public office in Oregon. She was elected to the Portland Public School Board in 1970.  She also served for many years as a Multnomah County Commissioner. In remembrance, her name now graces a public park in Portland, public housing, and most recently, Multnomah County’s new downtown health department building.

Gladys McCoy – Photo courtesy Multnomah County

When she died in 1993 from thyroid cancer, her name wasn’t on any buildings, and her friend, Venerable Booker, wanted to ensure her legacy was remembered.

Booker was then the President of American State Bank, the first Black-owned commercial bank in the Pacific Northwest, which was located in the building directly north of the memorial, now a dialysis center.

A few blocks north of the bank, Hillary Mackenzie owned an architecture firm. As a customer of American State Bank, she got to know Booker well and was hired to design the memorial. She recalled he had a clear vision for the project, which would include “a walkway so you have to enter in the site, to settle in and read it. He wanted that recognition and then he wanted it to be pretty, so it was a place people would linger for a few minutes.”

McCoy’s portrait has recently had a front-row seat to many protests marching past in the wake of the murder of George Floyd. After the first night of protests in May, Irvington resident Kate Thompson went to survey the damage she had heard about on MLK. Across from the smashed Nike store windows, she found herself lingering at the memorial. “I walked past it for over a decade, walking to work at Good Sam’s,” she said. “It was not until I retired that I had time to be curious about its history’.

She started pulling weeds that day and has been returning most Friday mornings for the last three months. She has recruited others who wanted to help and started calling the group the Gladys’ Garden Gnomes.  The garden has become a place for Thompson to channel her outrage of racial injustice into something positive.  “We all need time for reflection,” she said. “Quack grass gives us that opportunity.”

For Thompson and her fellow volunteers, pulling up weeds provides an apt metaphor for our nation’s racism. The grass is deeply rooted and sends out runners in many directions, making it difficult to remove. Thompson acknowledges that she doesn’t know what good it will do, but that “it’s a choice to have hope.”

Thompson has been in contact with Mackenzie to add irrigation and some other features to the original design, including a way to memorialize Venerable Booker, the man who made sure our community knew Gladys McCoy’s life was a Black life that mattered.

Kate Thompson and the five arborists from Mossy Tree Care – photo courtesy Kate Thompson

Update: In October Mossy Tree Care donated their time to get the trees in shape which was very appreciated especially after the big windstorm. According to Kate Thompson, “Five men from Mossy Tree Care each donated two and a half hours of energetic labor to clean up the hardscape of the garden. They were a delight to work with.”

Eliot Neighborhood Association Board Meeting Agenda 11/16/2020 6:30pm

Incoming co-Chairs: Jimmy Wilson and Allan Rudwick

Monday, November 16 6:30-8:00

Join Zoom Meeting (phone instructions at bottom)

Agenda:

1. Welcome & Introductions

2. Eliot NA Officer Elections

3. Racial sensitivity training proposal

4. Committee Updates – LUTC – Diesel Letter – crime (do we want an official subcommittee?)

5. Public Comment

6. Approve October Minutes

7. Adjourn

please join by phone if you have connection issues:

Dial by your location
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
Meeting ID: 847 8809 4161
Passcode: 097864  

Obituary: Errol Michael Beard—Bridging Art, Light and People in Portland and Beyond

Born in Portland, Oregon. Raised in Vancouver Washington. A 1968 graduate of Ft. Vancouver High School, he also attended the University of Washington, studying architecture. As a youngster he found it easiest to go by Mike, but in recent years many friends knew him as Errol. Mike passed away peacefully in his home from ongoing health issues. He was preceded in death by his brother Gary. He’s survived by his children, Christopher M. Beard 26, and Nicole M. Beard 24, both of Portland, as well as his brothers Ed and Jeff and his sister, Cheryl Cristobal.

Mike spent his life working in the arts, focused on architecture, bridges and serving the community. He started his business, Errolgraphics, in 1979. He was well known for his series of Mt. Hood Jazz Festival posters, beginning in 1983 with the piano floating on Trillium Lake and for his 19 years of posters promoting the Bite of Portland. He’s also known for his series of architectural renderings of Portland’s bridges and his images of the Golden Gate Bridge, the Brooklyn Bridge, as well as New York’s, Chicago’s, Pittsburg’s and London’s bridges and many other iconic structures. Mike did many projects promoting Portland, including the Portland Opera, Chamber Music Northwest, the Portland BridgePedal, the Arial Tram and more. His national works were often featured in popular cinema. Mike was a founding member of the Willamette Light Brigade, focusing on lighting the city’s bridges, and he was a driving force behind the Winter Light Festival. Mike’s body of work is large and included national treasures, some of which can be found in the National Archives.

He loved the arts, golfing, rafting, camping and connecting with friends and strangers alike. As a child he spent summers camping and waterskiing with his family. When his own children were young, he spent endless hours at their sporting events and camping with them around the Pacific Northwest. He loved where he lived. His neighborhood in NE Portland filled him with energy. His neighbors knew him to sit on his porch and talk with everyone. That porch was a neighborhood gathering place. Mike will be remembered by those who knew him as a fun and generous spirit. He was creative, thoughtful and talkative. He was a loving father, brother, neighbor, and friend.

Due to COVID-19, there will be no funeral service. Mike will be laid to rest at Evergreen Memorial Gardens in Vancouver WA.

Mike’s children, Chris and Nicole, intend to honor his life by continuing to manage and sell his works at Errolgraphics.com.

Community Flu Shot Clinics

From Legacy Health

We’re making it easy to protect your family and community from the seasonal flu. While supplies last, we’re offering free flu shots at select Legacy locations in Oregon and Southwest Washington. The vaccine is even more important this year with the COVID-19 pandemic.

It’s especially important for children to get vaccinated, even though they are not physically in school, because this group tends to be largest transmitters of the flu. The annual flu shot is the greatest defense against this yearly infection. These flu clinics are providing flu shots for anyone aged six months and older. No payment or insurance is required.

Our staff follows all necessary safety precautions to ensure you and your family can safely get your flu shot. You can also visit one of our two drive-thru location to get your shot in the comfort of your vehicle. Locations and details listed below. 

Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center
11/3 & 11/10
1pm – 7pm | Main Lobby
2211 NE 139th Street,
Vancouver, WA 98686

Legacy Medical Group
Family Wellness Clinic
11/6
1pm – 7pm | Drive Thru
1000 S.E Tech Center Drive, #120,
Vancouver, WA 98683

Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center
11/7 & 11/14
1pm – 7pm | Cascade Classroom
Cascade Building Sleep Center
24700 S.E Stark Street,
Gresham, OR 97030

Legacy Emanuel Medical Center
11/6 & 11/13
1pm – 7pm | Conf. Rm East / West
Medical Office Building 2
501 N. Graham Street,
Portland, OR 97227

Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center
11/4 & 11/11
1pm – 7pm | Drive Thru
Overton Parking Garage
2145 N.W. Overton Ave,
Portland, OR 97210

Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center
11/2 & 11/9
1pm – 7pm | Rm 117
Health Education Center
19300 S.W. 65th Ave,
Tualatin, OR 97062

Legacy Silverton Medical Center
11/4 & 11/12
1pm – 7pm | 1st Flr Lobby
Family Birth Center
342 Fairview Street,
Silverton, Oregon 97381

Legacy Holladay Park Campus
11/5 & 11/12
1pm – 7pm | Lab Conf. Rm
1225 NE 2nd Ave
Portland, OR 97232

What Do I Need to Know About the Portland City Charter?

The City of Portland uses a foundational document, known as the City Charter, as a guide to how the city should be governed (similarly to the way the US relies on the Constitution). Portland’s charter requires that the document be reviewed and updated at least once per decade. It’s time for just such a review and the city is kicking off the process now.

The Charter Review Commission has an opportunity to examine the way the existing charter works, including how the government operates, how officials are elected, and how the government is structured. The commission determines its own scope and sets its own timeline. The City of Portland oversees the selection of 20 Portland residents to form the commission and has vocally committed to creating an inclusive commission that is representative of Portland’s demographics (as well as the city’s geography). Each city commissioner selects four Portland residents to serve, including the mayor, for a total of 20.

Due to COVID-19, the Charter Review Commission will meet virtually. Commission members will receive a stipend of $500 in place of childcare, food, and transportation they would have received under normal circumstances. Commission members should expect the process to last for 18 to 24 months.

Several key issues are expected to come up during the commission’s review process:

  • Portland’s form of government: Portland is one of the few remaining cities using a commission-style government. Portland City Club published a report in 2019 (https://www.pdxcityclub.org/new-government/) on the inequities of commission-style governments and our need to adopt a more inclusive form of government. In the report, they directly connect the incredibly low numbers of women (9) and people of color (3) elected to the local use of a commission-based government. JoAnn Hardesty, elected in 2018, is the first woman of color to be elected to Portland’s city government. 
  • The City Auditor’s office: While Portland’s City Auditor is independently elected, the city charter grants control of the auditor’s budget to the city council, effectively allowing the city council to limit the power of the city auditor. Given that the auditor’s job is to examine the city council’s work and report back on the results to the people of Portland, the current city auditor, Mary Hull Caballero has concerns about that control. The city council asked that the Charter Review Commission examine the question.
  • Policing and community safety: The city charter sets expectations for public safety and could be used as an avenue to address defunding police, as well as implementing new approaches to public safety in Portland. 
  • Election reform and security: As other cities have adopted ranked-choice voting and other reforms through ballot measures, the city charter review process offers an alternative opportunity to explore municipal election reform. Furthermore, during the primary, the incumbent mayor and police commissioner, Ted Wheeler, accepted donations significantly larger than those allowed by the city charter.
  • Neighborhood associations: Portland’s neighborhood associations wield significant power and are primarily composed of affluent White home owners. The past few years have seen major critiques of these neighborhood associations as well as the Office of Community and Civic Life (formerly the Office of Neighborhood Involvement), which oversees the associations.
  • Prosper Portland: Previously known as the Portland Development Corporation, Prosper Portland’s existence is based on the city charter. The organization is responsible for a variety of so-called “urban renewal” projects that have gutted Black communities and stolen Black wealth in Portland, as well as displacing other communities.

Critics of the charter review process do suggest that city commissioners can prevent meaningful action by the Charter Review Commission, because they can vote to block the commission’s recommendations from taking effect. During the last charter review, in 2011, the commission pushed for the adoption of a new form of city government, but were largely ignored by the then-mayor and city council. The Charter Review Commission can choose to send recommendations directly to voters, provided 75 percent or more of the commission members agree to do so.

While the Charter Review Commission’s power is limited, there are arguments for participating in the process: commission members are empowered to investigate the way the City of Portland conducts business, which could help all residents of Portland better understand whether elected officials truly are working on our behalf. The city council may feel more pressure to listen to residents during these times of heightened attention on police forces and governments. And if city commissioners don’t listen to the Charter Review Commission? Portlanders know how to throw a good protest.

Tentative Timeline

  • June 30, 2020 — Charter Review Commission Work Session -read notes from the work session here. (https://www.portland.gov/omf/charter-review-commission/events/2020/6/30/charter-review-commission-work-session)
  • Fall 2020 — The City of Portland appoints Charter Review Commission members
  • Winter 2020 — The Charter Review Commission develops a work plan, including community engagement strategy and procedures
  • Early 2021 — The Charter Review Commission meets with community members to gather feedback.
  • Late 2021 — The Charter Review Commission provides an initial report to the Portland City Council.
  • January 2022 — The Charter Review Commission provides recommendations to the Portland City Council.
  • Spring 2022 — The Charter Review Commission and the City of Portland determine if changes to the charter must be voted on as ballot measures before implementation.

Additional Resources

Compiled by Thursday Bram. Please contact @ThursdayB on Twitter with comments, questions, and concerns. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. If you’re interested in using this information to create a more visually-oriented explainer, please contact Thursday!

I-5 Community Advisory Board Disbanded

I-5 freeway and surrounding area. This aerial view is from Google Maps.

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The Oregon Department of Transportation just decided to dissolve its community advisory committee (right before a meeting where about half the committee was going to resign) because they wanted to “ensure more input from Albina’s historic Black community”.

Not mentioned was the fact that the community advisory committee was given almost no power to make any changes to the project and was basically asked to be a rubber stamp on the project. The city of Portland and the Albina Vision Trust have both stepped back from the project, removing their support.

It feels like the internal politicians inside ODOT are trying desperately to keep this project moving in their desired direction. It also feels like community activists are very close to getting the project killed completely.