November 14, 2022 ENA LUTC Meeting Minutes

ENA LUTC Meeting Minutes: November 14, 2022

Fremont Bridgehead Project Presentation – Allan Rudwick

Link to Recording: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfHMcFXqs7H-qtIZm2BmbDqJJxGnrf3OZ8PYRKGzf5WKas6rQ/viewform?usp=sf_link

  • History & context of neighborhood
    • Displacement of homes for bridgehead and highway
    • Decreased census numbers
    • Removal of families
    • Proposed Prescott Freeway – never built
      • On ramps and off-ramps to this proposed freeway
    • Before and after images – dense single family homes; now parking lots and long ramp
  • Proposing removal of three quarters of ramp, essentially everything northeast of Mississippi Ave.
  • Question of ambulance access – new proposal would make for more direct access to ED for ambulances coming off the Fremont Bridge.
  • 8 acres would be reclaimed
  • Surrounded by City maintenance and shop yards
  • 6 acres on one side; 9 on other
  • Land valuation – high based on comparable land—$1 billion in land value and significant tax revenue
  • Keeping traffic down in adjacent neighborhoods is important
  • Pedestrian, bike and Tri-Met corridors could be constructed and cut off significant amounts of time and distance
  • Benefits:
    • ODOT: Less maintenance burden, opportunity to remedy bad design, positive public relations
    • City: Profit from land sale, tax revenue
      • Community: Compensation to displaced families, fill gap in urban fabric, rebuilt Tubman Middle School site
    • Legacy: Improved ED access
  • Next steps: City, community and state will all need to work together
    • Grant(s)
    • Stakeholder committee
    • Divide land, sell at auction
  • Q&A:
    • Carbon offset. Portland Clean Energy Fund.
    • New PPS school at Red Cross site?
      • Present to PPS
    • Reconnecting Communities grants for exactly these types of projects – part of federal infrastructure bill recently passed
    • Interest in keeping some public land for public use, for example a public pool or something similar to ease pressure on already existing public amenities in neighborhood
    • Include County leaders
  • Call to action – need to connect with organizations, etc. More voices.  Time to move past planning stages

Permits

  • Streimer rezoning
    • IG to EX. Layman’s terms: More industrial to slightly less industrial and flexible.
      • We will send letter that is supporting; mention that movement to EX across neighborhood is favored by ENA LUTC
        • Mike to write
      • Albina Library
        • Letter re support; push for activation on street front and less surface parking. Wonder Ballroom parking after hours, or other public parking use after hours
          • Jason to write
        • Vancouver & Russell apartment building
          • Unflattering design, no street front activation
          • Rezone push, generally supportive
          • Potential of LUTC signing on to higher height in exchange for better use of street front
          • Mike will write letter

Eliot Parking Committee

  • Allan is on committee

Freeway Lawsuit

  • Utilizing our network to fundraise

Updating ENA Design Guidelines

  • Current version does not address commercial or multi-family

Action Item:

  • Find old minutes and post online

Attendees:

  • Allan Rudwick
  • Mike Warwick
  • Andrew Champion
  • Jason Cohen
  • Michelle DePass
  • Doug Klotz
  • John Russell
  • Seth Anderson
  • John Pugsley
  • Paul Buchanan
  • Joseph Cortright
  • Alan Kessler
  • Jeremiah Via
  • Eric Wilhelm
  • Sherifa
  • Victoria
  • BNF

October 10, 2022 ENA LUTC Meeting Minutes

Attendees:

  • Eric & Shireen Hasan
  • Allan Rudwick
  • Alison Harmon
  • Mike Warwick
  • Kathryn Doherty-Chapman (PBOT)
  • Serena Li
  • Jason Cohen
  • Travis Sowerby
  • Suzanne McIllnay
  • Kyle Monroe
  • Danelle Isenhart
  • Mark Lisac
  • Taylor Gentry
  • Stan Hubert
  • Helen Spieth
  • Kyle Monroe
  • Clint Lundmark

  • PBOT spokesperson – Kathryn Doherty-Chapman (Kathryn.doherty-chapman@portlandoregon.gov)
    • The plan is to do a study and have a discussion. PBOT doesn’t know when, what, where or how much yet.  When PBOT does have a proposal, it will share widely and have an open house/survey.
    • Meter discussion. Permit parking.  Can stay beyond limit if you have a permit.
    • Wednesday night meetings on zoom going forwards. Regular meeting schedule.

  • Presentation on proposed apt. building on NE Graham – Danielle Isenhart, Travis Sowerby, & Mark Lisac
    • 29 units
    • Bike parking, no car parking
    • Three stories
    • Open questions
      • Q: Discussion of process – confusing that sign out front says nothing has been submitted to city; unclear where we are in terms of land use application
        • A: Not yet submitted for land use review
      • Q: Same address as existing building?
        • A: Will be partitioned
      • Q: Easement line for parking lot?
        • A: Will remain
      • Q: Difficult to understand where enterance and pedestrian ways are
        • A: Showing floorplan – screenshare
      • Q: Looks hard to get bikes inside – three doors to get to final rack location.
        • A: Yes, but not against code. Best we can do.
      • Q: Cost & time?
        • A: No cost projection yet; 12+ months
      • Q: Concern about too many units in the neighborhood; street parking being taken up; taking down beautiful trees
        • A: No response
      • Q: Who is the developer?
        • A: A family with an LLC but the architects are not willing to disclose their names. Lake Oswego P.O. Box.
      • Q: Low income options?
        • At least two under city rules
      • Q: Handicap accessible?
        • 8 type B units on ground floor and 1 type A unit on ground floor
      • Q: Is there market demand for this?
        • A: Yes

  • Demolition permit at 202 NE Graham
    • Looks like they are trying to demolish a garage and build an ADU on top
    • Garage has already been demolished

  • AirBNB contacts – City passes out a phone number to neighbors.

  • 7th & Tillamook Intersection
    • City is not doing anything in response to the neighborhood sentiment
    • Generic response letter to specific ENA LUTC letters
    • Should another letter be sent?
    • A neighbor who is an attorney has filed a lawsuit.
    • Leveraging Congressman Blumenauer?

  • Discussion about equity and inclusion in the development process in the neighborhood.

Eliot Parking Task Force Launching – Apply by September 21

The City of Portland is starting a task force to look at parking concerns in and around Eliot. You can find more details here. Below is a summary of some goals and a screenshot of their website.

They also want you to fill out a survey here about your experiences travelling and parking in Eliot

The Eliot NA board and land use committees have brought up several concerns like:

  • not burdening long-time residents with additional costs that are being brought by increased density
  • parking causing bike-car conflicts
  • varied parking demand across the demand means different solutions for different areas
  • not enough loading zones causing double-parking in places

Here’s the link to Apply to join the task force by September 21st. (I already did, it was easy)

Goals of parking management

The goal of parking management is to balance all the competing needs for on-street parking. Customers, commercial delivery drivers, and a growing population all need access to on-street parking.

Benefits of parking management include:

  • Better livability for residents
  • Better access to local businesses for customer and freight
  • Less congestion and carbon emissions
  • Better air quality and safety for everyone
  • Less illegal parking and fewer blocked driveways with regular enforcement
The City is launching a parking task force for Eliot. You could be a member.

March 14, 2022 ENA LUTC Meeting Minutes

  • Introductions
  • Present at meeting (non-presenters):
    • Brad Baker
    • Allan Rudwick
    • Jason Cohen
    • Andrew Champion
    • Monique Gaskins
  • PBOT Lloyd Event Parking District Presentation – Kathryn Doherty-Chapman
    • During games/concerts/big conventions – how can we encourage people not to park on the streets?
    • Lloyd focused but touches Eliot.
    • Once PBOT goes before City Council on this, they will seek to start the rate increase during events at $3/hr.
      • This rate will theoretically increase yearly as part of PBOT’s budget assuming capacity is being met.
    • PBOT is continuing to focus on the parking study in Northeast/Boise/Eliot over the coming years.
    • Equity: Transportation Wallet for Lloyd District residents.
    • Summary:
      • Rate increase during games and events in the evening/some day time event
      • Annual rate changes based on data
    • LUTC agreeing to write a letter of support of the Lloyd Event Parking District Plan as long as it dovetails into productive results in the future with the North Portland Parking Management Plan.  Eliot doesn’t want to get stuck with vehicles moving north to avoid the meters and no other benefit to the Eliot Neighborhood.
  • Presentation on Albina One – Winta Yohannes (Albina Vision Trust), Chandra Robinson (Lever Architecture), Carly Harrison (Consultant with Edlen & Co.), Gauri Vengurlekar (Consultant with Edlen & Co.), Samantha Lautman (Lever Architecture)
    • AVT Design Team introduction.  Collaborative group with different discipline backgrounds.
    • Community Hosts and Collaborators – Leading to community engagement.
    • AVT has been listening to community feedback for quite some time.
      • Experiences inform spaces
    • Creation of spectrum of density.
    • How does Albina One fit in to the Albina Vision.
      • Black history in the blacks around Abina One.
      • Access to waterfront important.
      • Little housing in Lower Albina currently—only Paramount Apartments.
        • Albina One meshing with Paramount Apartments.
    • Albina One features
      • Amenities on first floor, social resources, computers, playrooms, etc.
      • Grassy outdoor features for play, etc.
      • Views sweeping across westside.
      • Design from inside out.
    • Discussion about color on exterior
    • General sentiment of excitement regarding the project from the LUTC.
    • Opening community facing public spaces along the streetside frontage.
    • AVT answering questions.
    • AVT should be included in the PBOT Lloyd Event District Parking Plan.

February 15, 2022 LUTC Minutes

  • Present at today’s meeting:
    • Allan Rudwick
    • Brad Baker
    • Andrew Champion
    • Amelia Harris
    • Don Eiler
    • Jason Cohen
    • Paula
  • Introductions
  • Explanation of what LUTC does for new guests interested in the LUTC
  • PBOT guest speaker is not coming tonight due to illness
  • Discussion re: short term rental application at Rodney & Ivy (3412 NE Rodney)
    • LUTC historically has not taken a public position on STRs
    • Concern from guest about new STR application at that address representing that the owner lives on the premises but is not actually on site.
    • Based on the application, it sounds like it will be a “boarding house” style rental
    • Discussion about letting BDS know if there was a misrepresentation in the application
    • Paula going to reach out to zoning planner regarding a potential meeting/sit-down
  • Tax Appraisal Update
    • Houses in Eliot showing low tax rates due to low assessed values
    • Underutilized land in Eliot across the board—how to explore this.
  • Graham Lot Split Discussion
    • Will be done on a 100’ by 150’ lot
    • Will write the city a letter in support – Brad

December 13, 2021 LUTC Minutes

  • Present at meeting:
    • Allan Rudwick
    • Brad Baker
    • Andrew Champion
    • Jason Cohen
    • Ali Sadri
    • Thomasina Gabriele
    • Bob Gravely

Legacy Discussion (Represented by Ali Sadri and Thomasina Gabriele)

  • Prior City IMP requirements vs. new City campus zoning requirements going into effect end of 2023.
  • Legacy interaction with ENA will be the same, requirements same.
    • Yearly meetings with neighborhood.
  • Legacy has no plans for future development at Emanuel outside of the (now mostly completed) Kerby St. building.
    • Kerby St. building is not going to be occupied with tenants until end of 2022 at least.
      • Parking is not being used either.
  • Discussion about setback requirements—no major change here with transition from IMP to new campus zoning.
    • Legacy cannot build any significant height near sidewalk.

Kerby RFP

  • General sentiment of support from Legacy representatives.

Pacific Power (Represented by Bob Gravely)

  • PP is headed toward demolition of Knott St. building.
    • Putting out bid for demolition
    • Brick crumbling, lead paint, asbestos.
    • Graffiti removal.
    • Substation no longer housed inside.
  • PP is going to put more substation equipment in place of building.
  • PP looking for ways to integrate with neighborhood—landscaping?
    • Underground substation probably not an option.
  • Discussion about sanctioned graffiti.
  • Viewing site from satellite view—seeing lots of unused space.  Discussion about parceling off unused land for retail, housing, park, etc.
    • PP representative will look into this.
  • PP representative will try and bring back some drawings to us.

Event District Parking

  • Eliot up to Russell being included in parking study for event parking.
  • Eliot will be included in next year’s N Portland parking study.

Lloyd meters 2 hrs. to 5 hrs.

The rainy season returns! Adopt your neighborhood storm drain and help prevent street flooding

By Hannah Schafer

After an exceptionally dry summer, we’re celebrating the return of rain to Portland this weekend, and with it the return of the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s (PBOT) adopt a storm drain program.

Continue reading The rainy season returns! Adopt your neighborhood storm drain and help prevent street flooding

Historical Traffic Diversion in Boise Neighborhood, Installed and Uninstalled

During the pandemic, I have been doing a lot of reading about the history of my neighborhood, Eliot. I came across a number of plans from the 1960’s and 1970’s that affected inner North Portland. Joseph Cortright put together a 3-part series on how the Oregon Department of Transportation destroyed Albina, the biggest cultural center for Black Portlanders at the time. At the same time, Emanuel Hospital was expanded intentionally into the area between N Williams and N Kerby all the way to I-5/I-405. This was presaged by a short study called the Central Albina Study which recommended most of what is now the Eliot Neighborhood be demolished for Industry. Warehouses were recommended west of MLK Jr Blvd and South of N Fremont. This was later amended to west of N Williams avenue.

Continue reading Historical Traffic Diversion in Boise Neighborhood, Installed and Uninstalled

ODOT Teases New Highway Covers Options

For many years, The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has been planning to do a major widening of I-5 through the “Rose Quarter” (underneath the Flint, Broadway, Weidler, Williams, and Vancouver bridges). This project will be at least $800 Million and cause severe disruption to the southern Eliot Neighborhood if built. Recently,

Continue reading ODOT Teases New Highway Covers Options

The Human Cost of the I-5 Widening Project

The State and Regional governments renewed their commitment to the community destroying I-5 project by accepting the Transportation Department’s (ODOT) Environmental Assessment (EA).  To recap, ODOT, with the support of State leaders, intends to increase travel lanes in the Rose Quarter to eliminate the current lane-change bottleneck.  ODOT has tried to justify a project likely to cost a Billion dollars (!) for multiple reasons but has settled on “accident prevention.”  In so doing it can claim the additional lanes will not increase traffic volumes or speeds.  What it will do is make it easier for truck traffic from Lower Albina to merge onto I-5 and for all trucks to switch lanes to and from I-84 and I-405.  In other words, they claim commuters won’t benefit from time savings but lane changers will have fewer accidents.  Most of these claims have been either proven false or dependent on false assumptions.

Continue reading The Human Cost of the I-5 Widening Project

Slow Streets for Cyclists and Pedestrians

By Monique Gaskins

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/76829 Link for Tillimook Improvement Project

Autumn is upon us! As the summer temperatures start falling and the days continue getting shorter, here is your friendly reminder to keep or start spending time outside. Especially with the limitations of Covid-19, being able to maintain social distancing while also running, walking, or bicycling can be helpful to mental and physical well-being. Although all of us might not have easy access to parks or gyms right now, we do have access to some innovative use of our city streets. Eliot holds at least two major greenways (Tillamook and Rodney) and is adjacent to at least two more (Siskiyou and Going). 

The Portland Bureau of Transportation, PBOT, launched a new initiative, Safe Streets, during Covid-19 that encourages Portlanders who are not in an automobile to stop limiting their usage to the sidewalk on some of our local roads. The goals of this program are as follows: 

1) Facilitate access to more outdoor space

2) Enable walkers, runners, and bicycles to maintain social distance while using city streets and sidewalks (Also called Slow Streets)

3) Provide more options for businesses to allow social distance

Here is a written response to a couple of questions from PBOT’s Communications, John Brady: 

MG: How does the city see Safe Streets? Successful? Not?

JB: So far, the Slow Streets program is helping keep traffic volumes and speeds low on the neighborhood greenway network. In addition, nearly 800 calls and emails to the city’s 823-SAFE line have been overwhelmingly positive with many people requesting additional or specific locations for Slow Street installations.

MG: Are there any plans to improve Rodney, Going, or Tillamook Greenways in the near future?

JB: NE Tillamook just completed a capital improvement project that improved crossings and reduced speeds along the neighborhood greenway from N Flint to NE 28th. We are in the planning stages for the next phase of the project from NE 28th to NE 62nd. NE Rodney and NE Going are not in line for construction projects in the near future.

Within the Eliot neighborhood, Northeast Rodney Avenue and Northeast Tillamook Street both fall under the Slow Streets program. Since the initiative kicked off earlier this year, I’ve enjoyed more space to run and bicycle without worrying about being limited to the space of a sidewalk. So, consider this an open invitation to all of our neighbors: I hope to see you getting some fresh air on the neighborhood greenways! 

I-5 Community Advisory Board Disbanded

I-5 freeway and surrounding area. This aerial view is from Google Maps.

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The Oregon Department of Transportation just decided to dissolve its community advisory committee (right before a meeting where about half the committee was going to resign) because they wanted to “ensure more input from Albina’s historic Black community”.

Not mentioned was the fact that the community advisory committee was given almost no power to make any changes to the project and was basically asked to be a rubber stamp on the project. The city of Portland and the Albina Vision Trust have both stepped back from the project, removing their support.

It feels like the internal politicians inside ODOT are trying desperately to keep this project moving in their desired direction. It also feels like community activists are very close to getting the project killed completely.

The Road to a New Road, Interstate 5 Updates

By Ruth Eddy

The Oregon Department Of Transportation’s (ODOT)  plans to expand I-5 in our neighborhood are not moving at highway speeds. The reshaping of an asphalt landscape is slow. The big machinery that digs the dirt is quiet, the bureaucratic gears of planning and design are fully in motion, with three significant meetings occurring in the last few months.

First, the Oregon Transportation Committee (OTC) met on April 2nd to make a decision that had been delayed since December at Governor Brown’s request. At the end of the three-hour meeting, which was held on Zoom and live-streamed for the public on YouTube, the five-member board voted unanimously to move forward into a design phase on the I-5 Rose Quarter Project without completing an Environmental Impact Statement

In response to the forward motion set by the OTC, the project’s Executive Steering Committee (ESC) had its first Zoom meeting on May 22nd to set a framework by which to make future decisions about the project.  The 16 members of the ESC were led by facilitator Dr. Steven Holt. Half of nearly two-hour-long meeting was dedicated to introductions. Dr. Holt asked each of the members to answer the question, “What does restorative justice mean to you?”  The answers varied in detail but addressed similar themes. Marlon Holmes answered succinctly, “Calling on a community to address ills or wrongs committed against that community, and with the perpetrators addressing how those ills and wrongs have affected the community.” 

A week later, on May 28th, the Community Advisory Committee (CAC) held its second meeting, also on Zoom. According to Megan Chanel, the Rose Quarter Project manager, the project design was approximately 15% completed and CAC would advise all further work. “Think of it as we’ve brought the sandbox, but we need your help in burying some sand helping us build the sandcastle,” Chanel said.

Christopher John O’Connor, one of 24 members on the committee, believed the metaphor to be overly optimistic and offered his own saying, “The house has been built, we know how many bathrooms there’s going to be, we know what the general layout is, we’re going to be discussing… what color to paint it.”

Another member of the committee, Liz Fouther-Branch, expressed frustration with the obtuse language used to describe components of the project. Fouther-Branch said, “We need to be able to go back to our communities and speak to them in plain English about what the benefits are, what the impacts are. Breaking down the transportation language into community language so that you can build that trust in community.”

The CAC will meet again on Tuesday, June 23, 5:30-7:30. The next ESC meeting has not yet been scheduled, but all meetings are open to the public and archived on ODOT’s Youtube page.

We Can’t Stand By While Highways Are Widened

How I-5 was planned and built through Eliot in the 1950s and why we should not widen it

At a recent meeting, my Co-chair, Jimmy Wilson, asked me a pertinent question: “Where were white folks standing when Interstate-5 (I-5) was run through North Portland in the 1950’s?”  I decided to dig through archives to find out, visiting the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) website and then spending a significant amount of time on the Oregonian’s historical archive (found through Multnomah County Library). I also tried to find some other local news sources like the Northwest Clarion but unless I go find someone with an extensive microfilm archive and dig through it manually I don’t think I would find anything.

Eastbank Freeway Construction through the Broadway-Weidler Interchange in 1962. Photo courtesy Portland City Archives

In Northeast Portland, the intersection of Urban Renewal policies and Freeway Construction Policies combined to remove the heart of the Black community’s housing stock (over 800 units from the Eliot area alone) between 1955 and 1970. The Eliot and Lower Albina neighborhoods were decimated to make room for I-5, but even larger pieces were removed to make Memorial Coliseum and its parking lots. Later, Emanuel Hospital’s expansion dreams and the I-405 off-ramps removed even more of the community’s buildings and dislocated its people.

I was struck by the sheer pace of highway planning and construction during the late 1950’s through the Portland region. Planning or construction of all of the highways we now know within 5 miles of Eliot happened within 5 years. The roadway engineers had a seemingly limitless budget during those days, and they had tremendous power to reshape the city as well. They knew that highways became clogged with cars a few years after they were constructed through a process we now call “induced demand.” The highway engineers knew that I-84 (“the Banfield Freeway”) would soon become congested and had plans for a “Fremont Expressway” taking an east-west route through Northeast Portland and another “Mount Hood Freeway” taking an east-west route through Southeast Portland. Those routes will never be built, and from what I can tell, many of the existing highways should not have either. Uprisings over the removal of so many housing units prevented the later highways from being built, but not before Eliot and North Portland received the scar of I-5. These routes have served to increase the geographic footprint of our region and helped make everything more quickly accessible by car.  In doing so, these highways have also increased the dependence on the car for transportation throughout our region, increased the average distance of trips and increased the basic cost of living of citizens of the Portland Metropolitan Region.

The Interstate System was funded through the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 which authorized $25 Billion for the construction of 41,000 miles of the Interstate Highway system over a supposedly 10-year period. In the act, a Highway Trust Fund was created that paid for 90% of highway construction costs. This meant that state highway engineers could dream up huge plans and only needed a 10% match from local governments to build highways. This amazing subsidy may have helped highway builders of the time become desensitized to the value of the buildings they were destroying in the name of “progress.”

I found that there were other options considered for the “Minnesota Freeway” that we now know as I-5 from I-405 to the Washington border.  However, the main other option was the “Delaware Freeway,” a route more along N Greeley and N Delaware Avenues, one which would have removed slightly more houses and been slightly more expensive to construct. This option would still have taken the same path through the Eliot Neighborhood. The opposition to the Minnesota option was disorganized and didn’t coalesce around one specific alternative, which contributed to it being ignored. There was a bridge built at N. Ainsworth across the highway to mollify the principal of Ockley Green School, which would have had its district separated by the highway had that bridge not been built. To this day N. Ainsworth is one of the calmest places to cross I-5 in north Portland.

After this research, I thought to myself, okay, what about the section of highway that actually runs through Eliot?  It turns out that this was a bit challenging to find out about because it was actually considered a part of the “East Bank Freeway” even though this stretch between I-84 and N. Russell Street was not along the river.  This route may have been chosen by planners at the City of Portland signing off on plans prepared by the Oregon Department of Transportation. From the news of the day, it appears that the people living and working on the east side of the river were not substantially consulted in the process, even though hundreds of families would be displaced for the highway project. The first mention of this highway running through Eliot in The Oregonian was from January 1959, and in February and March there were some articles talking about the number of buildings to be torn down. At one point they were referred to as “Ancient Buildings.” By December, the right of way had been cleared. This is unbelievable to me:  Less than 6 months from the first timely public mention of the highway going through this area to the mayor approving the demolition, and 12 months from the first mention of the highway to complete demolition. A cursory note of the design of the Broadway, Williams, Weidler, Flint and Vancouver overpasses was made, as was a note that 29 other streets would be “terminated” or turned into dead ends.

During the demolition process, salvagers would pay prices as low as $5 for the right to salvage parts out of houses that would be demolished for the East Bank Freeway Route. One hundred and eighty households with 400 people were displaced by one count; another count I read included 250 households. Is it possible that those with the power to demolish buildings might not have been particularly concerned with those they were displacing?  To me, this is obviously the case. One article I read talked about the shocking record of non-litigation by homeowners on the route. Either property owners thought they were getting a fair deal by the Oregon Department of Transportation, or they had no leverage in the courts to make it worth the legal troubles.

With the power of hindsight, we do not have to repeat the mistakes of the past. ODOT is planning to widen I-5 underneath the 5-bridge intersection we now have around Broadway, Weidler, Vancouver, Williams and Flint Avenues. During the 1960s, there were a series of highway revolts across the country, resulting in the National Environmental Policy Act of 1959 governing roadway construction. As a result of this, the current proposal by ODOT to widen I-5 around the Broadway/Weidler Interchange, rebuild all of the roads that cross the highway, and provide some minor and questionably valuable “ community benefits” has been in the planning and engineering process for the past 10 years. During the time since the planning process started, the process of “approving” this project has been orchestrated in a way that no elected body has had a simple vote on whether they wanted to build this project or not. There have been several votes about what type of environmental review process to do, about whether we want to pass a huge transportation funding bill including this project, and about whether to approve buying land for the right of way of the project. However, no politicians have ever been asked to vote on whether to actually build this project.

The project is not particularly popular. Roughly 90% of the public comments about the project have been in opposition to building it, including the Eliot Neighborhood Association’s comments at every step of the way. The effects of highway construction are generally worst for those that live and spend their lives closest to the freeway. The local residents are subjected to detours, construction noise and pollution during the construction process. In addition, after project completion, the increased traffic on local streets and the highway will make quality of life for those living around the project worse. That increased traffic is all but guaranteed while widening highways. There is a nearly 1-to-1 relationship between the number of highway lane miles and traffic, whatever name you give to the lanes that you are building. If we look closer at what “local benefits” the project would have, we can see that just tweaking the street grid above the highway will have minor impacts at best. A new pedestrian crossing between Winning Way and NE Clackamas street was intended to be an asset, but highway planners have put such a curve in it that it will not shorten any journeys with its meandering path above a noisy highway. The Hancock-Dixon overpass will not substantially connect streets that are not served with the current Flint overpass we have now. Even the new “public spaces” created by the project will be small and triangular, possibly the site of camping since no accommodation for productive buildings on them is being made.

The only real change the project would make to the surrounding area would be widening the highway, a car-capacity increase that will barely change travel times through the area. It would also serve to put more cars into our local street network, which has led to renderings showing even wider streets through the area than we have now. This would increase road noise and reduce the value of land around the project area. Although trumpeted as a “traffic and safety project” it serves neither. Safety on other ODOT-managed streets is a much higher priority than in this corridor, which has not seen any deaths in a decade. Only congestion pricing has proved to improve traffic in urban environments, and we should be pursuing that sort of system instead of putting down more concrete.

Before this project started, drawings of how to reconstruct I-5 in a wider configuration with “minimal” impacts to traffic above were generated. This project has always been about a wider I-5 through the Broadway interchange, and everything else is just window dressing. It is not too late. Any benefits this project might have could be achieved at a much lower cost through other means.  We can still stop this $800 million boondoggle, which is clearly a continuation of the shameful history of highway construction in Portland’s inner neighborhoods. It is not too late.

40 is Plenty?

Residents on Eliot’s eastern edge have noticed the City recently installed “traffic calming devices (speed bumps)” on NE Seventh.  This is a result of the Transportation Commissioner’s rejection of the designation of NE Seventh as a Neighborhood Greenway in favor of NE 9th, despite the fact that route is blocked by Irvington Park, where bike riding on park paths is prohibited, and the direct connection of 7th to the new bike bridge over I-84 by Lloyd Center.  For those new to the area, Eliot has demanded traffic calming measures along Seventh for over 40 years due to the dangers presented to children accessing Irvington School, Tubman School and park, and Dishman Center.  At that time (the 1980s), Eliot was home to a many minority families and lower income residents.  Instead, the City put a higher priority on traffic calming measures on Irvington streets (15th and Knott) to benefit a predominately upper-class neighborhood.  Much of the traffic on Seventh in Eliot is from Irvington.  Nevertheless, I am glad the City has concluded that 40 years is long enough to delay desperately needed safety improvements for Eliot’s children, parents, and increasing number of seniors.  So far, the bumps are doing little to slow SUVs, pickups, and landscape companies, but sedan drivers are taking notice and will hopefully slow the rest (although I still see people passing “too slow” drivers!).  And, a word of caution, speeding between bumps and then breaking is the worst thing you can do for your car, so just slow to 20, or switch to MLK where speed limits are higher.