Diversity Community Gardening Co-Op at St Philip the Deacon Church

By Shireen Hasan

Gardening at St. Philip the Deacon Church is in swing. People walking by are stopping to take a peek at what is going on behind this historic church. Community volunteers have rolled up their sleeves to bring this amazing opportunity into fruition for the community; from planting seeds and starters, native plants, flowers, and watering, to laying bark chips, soil/compost, and building. Thank you to all the community participants, local residents of Eliot neighborhood, church members, and local organizations who have supported this initiative by donating hoses, plants, compost, starters, and other resources, supplies, and also monetary contributions to grow the community gardening initiative to feed the community!  Special thanks to Bellagio’s Pizza for donating massive amounts of delicious pizza to our garden party held on May 4, 2019! My stomach still hurts!

The team has so far built several garden beds for diverse community participation (African Americans, houseless, veterans, church members, youth, and low-income individuals). 

Work is being done around the church property to beautify the environment and ‘raise the vibration’. The Co-op is in conversation with Zenger Farms to bring in their farm’s extra harvest to allow folks complimentary access to healthy fruits, and vegetables at the church location. 

The initiative had suffered some setback and in moving forward to overcome a few barriers we are asking for the community’s continued support, contributions, and labor assistance to build an accessible garden bed for folks with disabilities who otherwise would not have access to gardening opportunities. 

We are also asking for a donation of a nice bench for the upcoming meditation area that will be designed for the church. In addition, we are looking for experienced or well-versed African American artists to work in collaboration with Reverend Maria, and current member artist, Su(e) Diyg, to preserve the memory of North/Northeast Portland’s African American diaspora by creating visual art for all to see and remember. 

Come join in with gardening fun, starting every Saturday in July from 11AM-1PM to continue the expansion of community gardening to feed the community and to add a nice, new makeover to the church grounds in the months to come!  

For more information email the coordinator, Shireen: at shihas_2005 at yahoo dot com.

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Free for All Summer Concert and Movie in the Park

Image of a bad playing at the gazebo at Dawson Park

It’s that time again and Black Parent Initiative (BPI) has teamed up with Portland Parks & Recreation to bring you another amazing fun filled event.  On Friday, August 16, 2019, we will be hosting Movie in the Park in collaboration with Portland Parks & Recreation’s Summer Free for All.  Similar to last year’s concert series, but all tied into a one-day spectacular event.  BPI will also be celebrating another successful year in services to the community by adding elements of our Family Fun Day.

We have the pleasure of bringing you a host of activities including: 

♦ Portland Trail Blazers Basketball Clinics

♦ Nike “Made to Play” Activity Van

♦ Bouncin Bins Bounce House

♦ Mystique’s Fancy Faces Face Painting

♦ PACKY Academy Arts & Crafts

♦ SMART Book Give Away

♦ Eliot Neighborhood Association Domino Tournament

♦ Portland Children’s Museum

♦ And many more

The event will start at 4 pm with activities going until about 7 pm.  As a part of the Movie in the Park there will be a concert at 6:30 pm featuring Mz. Etta’s World, followed by a showing of Captain Marvel when it gets dark!  

Food trucks on site include Hana’s Authentic New Orleans Snowballs and Stoopid Burger.

There will be tons of giveaways, drawings, and resources!  Make sure you join us as we celebrate community, music, and movies!  This will be fun for the entire family.

Friday, August 16, 2019

4pm

Dawson Park 

(corner Stanton & N Williams)

For more information or to become a sponsor please contact leigh dot bohannon at thebpi dot org.

For the full schedule of Summer Free For All Concerts and Movies in the Park visit:

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/parks/69554

By Leigh Bohannon

Sponsored by:

Overcoming Oregon’s Past and Embracing Diversity

By Monique Gaskins

Summer is here! Portlanders can take advantage of the warmer weather to explore new parts of town and meet new people. While moving around Portland, you might notice posters supporting neighbors of various ethnic, racial, and religious backgrounds. Although this might seem unnecessary in “liberal Portland,” this wasn’t always the case. Starting before Oregon even achieved statehood, its inhabitants enacted various laws to preclude the immigration of non-white neighbors.

You may have overheard jokes about the lack of diversity in Oregon. For example, “There are no Black people in Portland.” Or, “You live in the Great White North.” You might have shaken your head and continued on, but the lack of diversity in Oregon is very real and isn’t due to chance. According to The US Census Bureau’s 2018 data, the percentage of Black residents nationwide is 13%. The percentage for the state of Oregon is 2%. The city of Portland is slightly higher, with 6% black residents. 

The low number of black residents in Oregon is not an accident and is the outcome of over 150 years of exclusionary policies.

  • 1844: The first Black exclusion law was adopted. This law mandated that “blacks attempting to settle in Oregon would be publicly whipped—thirty-nine lashes, repeated every six months—until they departed.”
  • 1850: The Donation land act of 1850 granted land to white settlers, establishing home ownership specifically to whites. This offered an incentive for more whites to populate Oregon, and reap the benefits of land ownership.
  • 1857: The Oregon Constitution was adopted. It excluded blacks from legal residence, including voting, using the legal system, and owning property. 

After explicit race-based policies were unavailable, other methods were utilized to maintain the homogenous status quo. The Ku Klux Klan had an active presence in Oregon, targeting not only black but also Jews and Catholics. This preference towards white protestant neighbors led many neighborhoods and individual homeowners to add restrictive clauses to their deeds or neighborhood documentation. For example, a deed from neighboring Irvington (officially Dolph Park at the time) included the following, “For a period of twenty-five years from the date of this dedication, the premises shall be used exclusively for residence purposes and shall be occupied by the white race and no member of any race other than the white race shall own or occupy any portion of DOLPH PARK”. This practice, called Redlining, made it difficult to procure bank loans and housing insurance for homes in non-white neighborhoods. Redlining also meant that these homes weren’t providing as many wealth building opportunities to its owners as those in white neighborhoods.

These clauses and related attitudes consolidated non-protestant whites into specific areas of the city, such as Eliot. From 1910 to the 1960s, blacks began moving to Eliot because of its convenient location to transportation, railroad, and hotel jobs. After the end of World War II, Portland targeted Albina (including Eliot) as a suitable neighborhood for blacks who were displaced in the Vanport flood of 1948. According to an interactive redlining map of Portland from around 1930, the Eliot neighborhood ranked as “Hazardous”, the lowest of 4 possible categories. The clarifying remarks are, “Zoned multi-family residential and business. This area constitutes Portland’s “Melting Pot” and is the nearest approach to a “slum district” in the city. “Three-quarters of the Negro population of the city reside here and in addition there are some 300 Orientals, 1000 Southern Europeans and Russians.” These categories made it difficult to qualify for loans and home insurance in Eliot, but residents often didn’t have much choice, as they were unwelcome in other parts of the city.

Portland’s lukewarm approval of a multicultural neighborhood in the middle of the city wouldn’t last. In the 1960s, the I-5 construction destroyed parts of Eliot and displaced many black residents. In the early 1970s, the city condemned parts of Eliot – including the land purchased for Legacy Emanuel – further disrupting black families. 

Today, housing in Portland is unaffordable for many people of all races, religions, and ethnicities. Let’s move beyond our history, and support policies that help all people feel more housing secure in our state, city, and neighborhood. A key to helping our neighborhood thrive is to allow diverse types of housing that would be more affordable to more people. Currently, much of Eliot is zoned for single-family homes, pushing up housing costs, and supporting a policy with racist roots. The Residential Infill Project aims to make housing more affordable by allowing more types of housing to be built in areas zoned for only single-family homes. Another resource is Portland for Everyone. They’re advocating for housing that will serve many different types of neighbors. 

Let’s learn from past mistakes and embrace diversity. Let’s be good neighbors, especially for people that might not have historically been welcomed in Oregon.

Bountiful Produce and Community at Albina Cooperative Garden

By Kat Severi

A close up image of a bee on a yellow sunflower next to a green leaf

It’s summertime now and the gardens are thriving here at Albina Cooperative Garden! We are a community based, urban farm located in the Eliot neighborhood on the corner of Russell Street and Vancouver Avenue. This large, organic gardening project produces impressive amounts of delicious produce every season here in the heart of NE Portland. 

The flowers in our pollinator garden are in full bloom and the bees are doing their work, lettuce, chard, and arugula are fresh as can be, potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and basil plants are looking fantastic. We are so busy this time of year with crops growing bigger every day and even new seeds are being sown for the fall and winter harvest. Come by and say hello, we are often out in the sun (or rain), cultivating the soil that borders Legacy Emanuel Hospital who gifted this land to the Eliot neighborhood many years ago. Take a stroll through our thriving garden spaces, try a taste of some fresh sugar snap peas, bush beans, sweet peppers or luscious strawberries, maybe relax in the orchard and listen to the sounds of the many creatures that live here, bumblebees, butterfly wings, and bird songs.

Our members maintain this land for growing food and creating a living, green space in the center of the city. We educate citizens on sustainability and organic urban food production, we come together as a cooperative organization to share those values with our Eliot neighbors and our greater Portland community. 

Interested in membership? All are welcome to share in the year-round bounty in trade for satisfying work and a small annual membership fee. Eliot neighbors that need financial assistance are welcome to join us through a generous scholarship fund gifted to you, the community by the Eliot Neighborhood Association, please do email us for the application at albinacooperativegarden at gmail dot com

Visit our Instagram @albinacooperativegarden and Facebook page Albina Cooperative Garden for our garden events, membership signup or to find out how you can join the next Saturday work party.

Walk Williams Wednesdays… All Summer Long

By Dane Fredericks

Lace up your boots and bring a friend for Walk Williams, a summer party thrown by Williams and Vancouver businesses. Join us for free pedicab rides, live music, entertainers, pop-ups and prizes.

Pick up an event passport at participating businesses on each second Wednesday starting June through October from 4-8pm then eat, shop and play to earn three stickers and turn your passport in for automatic prizes like beer, chocolate or oysters. Each passport you submit is entered into our grand prize raffle, meaning you can play five Walk Williams, automatically win five monthly prizes and enter five times in the grand prize drawing.

August 14, September 11, October 9 from 4-8pm at participating Williams/Vancouver businesses. Prizes, participants and full event details at williamsdistrict.com/walkwilliams

Adopt-A-Block Update: More, Please

I’m writing to thank all those adopt-a-blockers who kept up the good fight and did their best to keep Eliot’s streets clean this past spring.  Not easy dealing with the cold and wet, plus all the maneuvering between construction equipment that many of you are still enduring via our on-going sewer work.  But you did your neighborhood proud!  

Alas, there are still streets awaiting their loving adoption families… (so many still needed!) and we’d love to have you on board.  If you’re willing to spend a few minutes a day, or a bit longer once or twice a week to improve the area you call home, please contact Jody at jodyguth at gmail dot com. I’ll get you set up with trash bags, gloves, pickers, and lots of encouragement.  The added bonus is the drawing we hold every 3 months to determine who wins a $100.00 New Seasons gift certificate.  Who doesn’t like to shop at New Seasons?!

I had the pleasure of recently drawing our current winner with my trusty pal, Adrian. The latest number was lucky 16, and the recipient none other than Sue Stringer, a gal who does so much for our community… congratulations, Sue!! Besides being the editor of our Eliot News newspaper, Sue finds time to be a member of the Friends of NE 7th Avenue Greenway committee, is on the Eliot neighborhood board and is one of the fabulous organizers the 7th Avenue block party fame (between Russell and Brazee).  Sue is eager to join whatever she can to help make Eliot thrive.  While also working a full-time job, I’m never sure how she finds the time to get it all done. We’re just so glad she lives here! 

By Jody Guth

Legacy Emanuel Medical Center to Begin Large Tree Planting Project around the 50-Acre Campus

By Vicki Guinn

On Tuesday, March 5 at 10 am near the main entrance of Legacy Emanuel Medical Center there was a tree planting ceremony. The medical center will receive and plant 30 trees in the first phase of a larger tree planting on the 50-acre campus, which includes Randall Children’s Hospital and the Legacy Oregon Burn Center. This year and next, up to 150 trees will be planted.

Continue reading Legacy Emanuel Medical Center to Begin Large Tree Planting Project around the 50-Acre Campus

Compatibility in a Conservation District

By Jonathan Konkol, AICP; Eliot LUTC Vice Chair

Picture of a cream and wood building with a white truck parked in front
Duplex under construction in the Boise Neighborhood. Photo credit Jonathan Konkol.

There’s a perennial debate in the design and planning world about what kinds of standards are appropriate for new development in a historical context. Should new buildings blend in, or stand in contrast? Is it “phony” or “context- sensitive” to replicate historic vernacular forms?

Continue reading Compatibility in a Conservation District

Albina Vision Trust

By Ruth Eddie

Imagine public parks, affordable housing and local business tucked between the large concrete buildings in the Rose Quarter. Imagine a public waterfront park on the east side of the Willamette and a cap over I-5. This is the vision of Albina Vision Trust. The vision looks 50 years into the future, but the work has already begun.

Continue reading Albina Vision Trust

OnPoint Community Credit Union Expands Presence in Portland’s Eastside with New Fremont and Williams Branch

By Erin Moore

OnPoint Community Credit Union opened a new, full-service Portland branch on NE Fremont Street at N. Williams Avenue on August 30, 2018. Located in the walkable and bike-friendly North Williams Corridor, the branch features a bike-thru teller window. This is OnPoint’s second new branch in Portland’s vibrant eastside, having opened its Hawthorne branch in May of 2018.

Continue reading OnPoint Community Credit Union Expands Presence in Portland’s Eastside with New Fremont and Williams Branch

New Trees for Eliot Thanks to Friends of Trees

By Matt Morrissey

Our neighborhood is in the midst of significant tree planting due to the initiative of local residents, some businesses and Friends of Trees. On March 9 Friends of Trees held its annual residential planting event with volunteers from the community. It’s never too early to sign up for street or yard trees for next winter’s planting at friendsoftrees.org, or you can contact me, one of the volunteer neighborhood coordinators for Friends of Trees in Eliot, at morrissey.matt@ymail.com if you have questions about trees for your home.

Continue reading New Trees for Eliot Thanks to Friends of Trees

With Laughter and Tears, Ribbon Cutting Celebrates Community Champions and Opening of Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare’s Garlington Campus

By Jennifer Moffatt

$4.3 million raised to provide whole health care services in NE Portland

At a moving ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by 250 supporters, including federal and county officials and community partners, Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare celebrated the opening of its new Garlington Campus, home to the Garlington Health Center and Garlington Place Apartments, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, in Northeast Portland.

Continue reading With Laughter and Tears, Ribbon Cutting Celebrates Community Champions and Opening of Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare’s Garlington Campus

Within and Beyond the Borders of Eliot—Women-Owned Businesses

This column features businesses in Eliot and just beyond our neighborhood’s borders to help our residents learn what exciting businesses and opportunities are located in and around our amazing neighborhood.

This issue we focus on women-owned businesses in and around Eliot. See the list below for other women-owned businesses to check out.

Continue reading Within and Beyond the Borders of Eliot—Women-Owned Businesses

Black Parent Initiative Welcomes New Board of Directors and Advisory Board

By James Posey, BPI Board Chair

Truly, the Black Parent Initiative (BPI) has much to be thankful for. We are so grateful for the unwavering support of so many community members, donors and friends. Please let us take this opportunity to update you on our progress and challenges.

Continue reading Black Parent Initiative Welcomes New Board of Directors and Advisory Board