Blog

Change Now

By Jimmy Wilson

I commend Chief Jami Resch who knew deep down in her heart and soul that in these times, she wasn’t the right fit for the job. That took courage and will power coming from a white person in a high office to choose a black man who deserved it. This needs to happen all over the country from the top legislation, congress, and the senate. This is what the black community needs to see now. For example, legislation needs to work for the interest of the people and not the special interest of the lobbyist.  

We as the people of color need change to supersede the Portland Police Bureau union contract and local policies by using tools like Civil Rights and Civil Liberties instead of using the word willful by replacing it with words like standards and reckless.  

We also need the Police to wear body cameras at all times.  Black people need infrastructures such as education, administration, reparation, jobs, justice, and inclusions to eliminate racial disparities. The two hundred forty-six million dollars that is allocated for the Portland Police Bureau for the year 2020 – 2021 proposed budget should be decided by including black people seated around the table.  

Eliot Neighborhood Association Board meeting minutes April 20, 2020

Chairs: Jimmy Wilson & Allan Rudwick

6:30 pm via ZOOM

Board Members Attending:

  • Allan Rudwick
  • Jonathan Konkol
  • Jim Hlava
  • Sue  Stringer
  • Shireen Hasan
  • Jere Fitterman
  • Jimmy Wilson
  • Jennifer Wilcox
  • Pat Montgomery

Other individuals attending:

  • Aaron Brown of No More Freeways PDX
  • Scott Kocher
  • Monique Gaskins
  • Bradley Baker (Land Use Transportation)
  • Brooke Babcock (Clean Air Committee)
  • Mary Peveto (Executive Director Clean Air)

Meeting Called to Order: 6:35

Welcome & Introductions

The Freeway Fight (Aaron Brown, No More Freeways PDX)

Aaron gave some background information on ODOT’s Rose Quarter Improvement Project.  ODOT wants to expand the freeway, widening I-5 into the backyard of Harriet Tubman Middle School.  No More Freeways is working toward bringing ODOT to court about not being in compliance with laws. Two major tracks:

One track is the Governor’s Executive Order on Climate: Every government agency needs to be held responsible for climate impact. ODOT and OTC are covered by this executive order.

The second track is to focus on the impact on the local neighborhood, to argue that ODOT conducted a truncated environmental assessment

Is the Eliot neighborhood Association willing to be a part of these lawsuits?  We have as an association voted to oppose this several times in the past.

There was much discussion and many questions were raised about being a plaintiff including: What would being a plaintiff mean in this context? How will this affect insurance?

What are the risks? What are other options?

What personal actions would we be expected to take? The tasks we would be responsible for as a plaintiff include: communications, providing quotes to newspapers. Probably not a lot of asks as a whole group, periodic check ins with the organization, making decisions as they come up. 

What is the timeline? Hope to move in the next few weeks, then as long as the project is in process. ODOT claims they will break ground in 2023.

It was decided to move on to the other items on the agenda and provide more background information to members of the committee to help them make a decision.

Neighbors for Clean Air Presentation (Mary Peveto)

Mary gave an overview of Neighbors for Clean Air. They have worked with Harriet Tubman on clean air concerns for years.  They have also worked with the school board to develop an HVAC indoor air quality system to protect the children.  They have an NIH grant to understand total quantity of air impact. 

Their focus: everything they look through is about air quality. Their most recent fight was to petition the state to do rule making around indirect sources of pollution. The single biggest contributor to pollution is using older diesel engines.  HB2007 will regulate the trucks in the Portland metro area. Most diesel pollution comes from non-road sources: construction, rail and marine. They are looking at options right now for how to address this issue.  Want to put the problem of diesel on our radar.  About to launch a new website to help explain this to people and help them understand the problem with diesel air pollution. Diesel the most deadly thing in our air.

Mary suggested we read the series in the Oregonian: Polluted by Money. https://projects.oregonlive.com/polluted-by-money/

It is a political problem.  Associations of contractors have been able to hold off any changes in laws.  We are a dumping ground for old equipment because we have no regulations.  Outside Oregon professional interests are trying to hold the line against Oregon’s progressive interests.

Strategy question: would approaching companies individually trying to have them change their ways be effective?  Mary did that work with Vigor (the shipping company) and made significant changes.  But the Port of Portland won’t make those changes.  Mary states she is happy to work with us if there is a company we want to work with.  She can help them get government grants to make changes.

It was decided that Mary and Jimmy will sit down together to discuss options.  

COVID-19 – Updates on how everyone is doing / things we need right now.

The board members did a general check in about how they were doing during the current crisis and what thoughts or ideas people had. Some highlights included:

  • there is a testing site at One Medical in the parking lot of the Vancouver Baptist Church.  Have to join One Medical to get tested. They are offering free membership for the first 30 days.  An interesting medical model.  The Oasis of Change behind the Elks Lodge are also doing virus testing.
  • Jimmy received a Tri-Met Lift bus. How can he use it for COVID? If anyone has an idea let him know. Could people donate clothes and use it as a traveling clothing center?  Could also pick up food and deliver it.
  • Meals are what is needed because a lot of food sites have shut down. Meals on Wheels has also cut back. It was suggested we put something on the website about how to volunteer with Meals on Wheels

Updates

 – NECN update: pushing out a weekly email of resources.  They have an excellent website and their newsletter is on the website. Resources for COVID 19 which includes info about employment, money and housing, and how to get info about help.  They got statements from 92 out of 94 candidates in the upcoming election. Very informative.

 – Treasurer’s report: we are still slowly losing money month after month.  The first three months of this year just over $1000.  Balance: $8300.  Was someone going to reach out to the Blazers?  That is the only source of revenue that we could potentially have. Bringing the Blazer money back should be a top priority.  Jimmy tried to reach out to the person who did it in the past.  He will reach out to Angela to find out who to connect with.  She can potentially help him figure it out. Jere also offered to help. 

Newsletter: Does it make sense to produce 4 issues of the newsletter this year?  Will we have advertisers?  Sue has almost covered the costs for the summer issue.  Have some good ideas for content as well. Will know by the May meeting on what she has or needs.  Now would be a good time to interview neighbors and spotlight on people.

 – Land Use: Not much to tell. Had a short meeting, agreed to move forward with the Rose Quarter Project lawsuit.  Allan will host a meeting to provide background info about the project for those that need it. 

Webmaster– call for a new one: Thursday stepped down from being webmaster.  Sue is currently covering and enjoying learning WordPress.

 Jere, Sue and Allan will coordinate about a communication strategy.

Next month will meet via Zoom again. 

Adjourned 8:31.

Eliot Neighborhood Association Board meeting minutes May 18, 2020

Chairs: Jimmy Wilson & Allan Rudwick

Monday, June 15 2020

6:30-8:00 pm

Board Members Present:

Allan Rudwick

Jimmy Wilson

Jonathan Konkol

Shireen Hasan

Jim Hlava

Sue Stringer

Darren Holcomb

Others Present:

William Francis (Community Cycling Center)

Cameron Whitten (Black Resilience Fund)

Meeting called to order at 6:33pm

1 Welcome & Introductions

2. William Francis of the Community Cycling Center spoke.  The Community Cycling Center’s mission is to broaden access to bicycling and its benefits.  More than just a bike shop, they do a holiday bike drive, donate bikes each year, run a repair shack in the New Columbia Village, offer a low income community discount and several other programs.  They are located on NE Alberta street. 

During the pandemic the Community Cycling Center is working towards providing mutual aid.  They are connected with a food pantry at the Rosa Parks school and another pantry in the Cully neighborhood.  They are reaching 91 families delivering food by bicycle each week.  There is a team of 6 volunteers making the deliveries.  The idea is to bring food to individuals who may not be able to go to pantries for a variety of reasons. 

They are looking for a food pantry to partner with in our neighborhood. There is one at the Boise Eliot School.  Immaculate Heart church has a food pantry.  Saint Philip the Deacon gives out food on Saturdays. They would also need to gather names of individuals or families in need.  They make their deliveries by bike so families need to be within a 1-2-mile radius.  Discussed putting an article up on the web about the program and then updating it for the fall newsletter.  Sue will put a brief ad in the summer issue of the newsletter to ask for individuals who are in need of support.  Shireen agreed to be the point person to help coordinate the neighborhood needs. Allan will also connect William to the Boise Eliot School as a way to gather names of families in need.

3. Cameron Whitten of the Black Resilience Fund spoke.  The fund was founded two weeks ago to create resources to provide immediate support to Black Portlanders. They have received over 3000 applications for support.  Their goal is to raise $1 million, and they are more than halfway there.  They want to support a path toward healing and reconciliation to communities; create joy and build community.  Their model is culturally specific.  People who apply are being interviewed by Black Portlanders and funds are delivered by Black Portlanders.  It is creating a way for individuals to be more connected. The website: BlackResiliencefund.com has lots of great stories.  The fund is solving immediate needs for neighbors who are currently suffering.  Becoming a program of the nonprofit Brown Hope. Jimmy stated it was very encouraging to see this work.  He suggested that Cameron speak to the mayor.  Black 211 workers are able to volunteer their time to help with Black Resilience Fund.  It is a very empowering experience for many people.  Sue suggested putting something on the website and also an article in the newsletter in the fall.  Over 600 people applied to volunteer. Two co-founders. Shireen moved we donate $1000 to the Black Resilience Fund.  Darren secondedMotion passed unanimously.

4 Newsletter updates: Sue is finishing up the layout right now.  Goal is to get it in everyone’s mailbox by July 1st.  We have 12 pages which include interviews with essential workers, info about I-5, COVID-19 testing and many other articles.  We are covering the cost for the issue though we are light on advertising. Would love to get more voices from the community for the next issue.  Jimmy gave a statement about the protests.  Sue reached out to Jimmy Wilson, Shireen Hasan, and Patricia Montgomery and Monique Gaskins to make sure the Black perspective was included in the newsletter.  Jimmy wanted to make sure Sue explained why she asked those individuals in particular.  She stated did not want to say the wrong thing or go in the wrong direction in the newsletter.  Discussed the importance of honoring this moment.  Jimmy said we are all in this together.  Sue shared Jimmy’s statement to the group and a few edits were made.

5. Statement of support: Allan sent out a statement of support for the Black Lives Matter movement before the meeting. The idea is to acknowledge that we have been a part of the problem in the past and that we want to work to make amends and promote an anti-racist society.  The group reviewed and edited the statement.  We also agreed to add a paragraph to the masthead of the newsletter.

6 Ongoing business:

  • Land Use Committee did not meet this month.  Nothing to report.
  • Stanton Street have not been able to meet with the police.  The police are not able to commit at this time because they are busy with the protests.
  • Livability committee: Adopt a Block is the focus at this point. Do $100 gift certificate drawing quarterly for individuals who are doing the Adopt A Block.  Sue will talk with Jodi about how to connect the committee more closely with the Board.  Jimmy stated he feels like he is stuck and not making progress with the Blazers. Jere gave Jimmy a list of names and an email chain but he does not know those individuals.  He does not want to contact someone he has not been introduced to.  Jimmy is trying to get support from the Board so he can do his job. Karla Gosnell has had the most recent contact with the Blazers but we don’t know if her contact is even still with the Blazers.  Who can make this connection?  Sue will reach out to Karla to make a connection with Jimmy and the Blazers
  • Jere is stepping down from the board.  She does not feel she can make the time commitment. 
  • Allan listened into the Emanuel Displaced Persons 2 Zoom call.  They are a group of descendants of the un-kept promises from that era. EDP2 is asking the Eliot Neighborhood Association to sign onto a letter that would negate the current process for the Hill Block.  Jimmy stated that Emanuel has not followed through on their promises.  He also pointed out that there are Blacks fighting against Blacks, both groups have ancestors who were affected by the displacements.  As a neighborhood association we have asked for more land to be donated. What is our goal? Jimmy suggested that we need to protect our name and not put our name on anything until we know it is right. Shireen suggested that Byrd come to another meeting to clarify. Some people in the group decided to stay out of the conflict between the two groups. Shireen did not agree with this decision.
  • April Minutes: Allan moved the minutes be approved as corrected, Sue seconded. Motion passed.
  • May Minutes: Allan moved that the minutes be approved as corrected., Jonathan seconded. Motion passed.

Meeting adjourned at 8:50

Eliot Neighborhood Association Board meeting minutes June 15, 2020

Chairs: Jimmy Wilson & Allan Rudwick

Monday, June 15 2020

6:30-8:00 pm

Board Members Present:

Allan Rudwick

Jennifer Wilcox

Jimmy Wilson

Jonathan Konkol

Shireen Hasan

Jim Hlava

Sue Stringer

Darren Holcomb

Others Present:

William Francis (Community Cycling Center)

Cameron Whitten (Black Resilience Fund)

Meeting called to order at 6:33pm

1 Welcome & Introductions

2. William Francis of the Community Cycling Center spoke.  The Community Cycling Center’s mission is to broaden access to bicycling and its benefits.  More than just a bike shop, they do a holiday bike drive, donate bikes each year, run a repair shack in the New Columbia Village, offer a low income community discount and several other programs.  They are located on NE Alberta street. 

During the pandemic the Community Cycling Center is working towards providing mutual aid.  They are connected with a food pantry at the Rosa Parks school and another pantry in the Cully neighborhood.  They are reaching 91 families delivering food by bicycle each week.  There is a team of 6 volunteers making the deliveries.  The idea is to bring food to individuals who may not be able to go to pantries for a variety of reasons. 

They are looking for a food pantry to partner with in our neighborhood. There is one at the Boise Eliot School.  Immaculate Heart church has a food pantry.  Saint Philip the Deacon gives out food on Saturdays. They would also need to gather names of individuals or families in need.  They make their deliveries by bike so families need to be within a 1-2-mile radius.  Discussed putting an article up on the web about the program and then updating it for the fall newsletter.  Sue will put a brief ad in the summer issue of the newsletter to ask for individuals who are in need of support.  Shireen agreed to be the point person to help coordinate the neighborhood needs. Allan will also connect William to the Boise Eliot School as a way to gather names of families in need.

3. Cameron Whitten of the Black Resilience Fund spoke.  The fund was founded two weeks ago to create resources to provide immediate support to Black Portlanders. They have received over 3000 applications for support.  Their goal is to raise $1 million, and they are more than halfway there.  They want to support a path toward healing and reconciliation to communities; create joy and build community.  Their model is culturally specific.  People who apply are being interviewed by Black Portlanders and funds are delivered by Black Portlanders.  It is creating a way for individuals to be more connected. The website: BlackResiliencefund.com has lots of great stories.  The fund is solving immediate needs for neighbors who are currently suffering.  Becoming a program of the nonprofit Brown Hope. Jimmy stated it was very encouraging to see this work.  He suggested that Cameron speak to the mayor.  Black 211 workers are able to volunteer their time to help with Black Resilience Fund.  It is a very empowering experience for many people.  Sue suggested putting something on the website and also an article in the newsletter in the fall.  Over 600 people applied to volunteer. Two co-founders. Shireen moved we donate $1000 to the Black Resilience Fund.  Darren secondedMotion passed unanimously.

4 Newsletter updates: Sue is finishing up the layout right now.  Goal is to get it in everyone’s mailbox by July 1st.  We have 12 pages which include interviews with essential workers, info about I-5, COVID-19 testing and many other articles.  We are covering the cost for the issue though we are light on advertising. Would love to get more voices from the community for the next issue.  Jimmy gave a statement about the protests.  Sue reached out to Jimmy Wilson, Shireen Hasan, and Patricia Montgomery and Monique Gaskins to make sure the Black perspective was included in the newsletter.  Jimmy wanted to make sure Sue explained why she asked those individuals in particular.  She stated did not want to say the wrong thing or go in the wrong direction in the newsletter.  Discussed the importance of honoring this moment.  Jimmy said we are all in this together.  Sue shared Jimmy’s statement to the group and a few edits were made.

5. Statement of support: Allan sent out a statement of support for the Black Lives Matter movement before the meeting. The idea is to acknowledge that we have been a part of the problem in the past and that we want to work to make amends and promote an anti-racist society.  The group reviewed and edited the statement.  We also agreed to add a paragraph to the masthead of the newsletter.

6 Ongoing business:

  • Land Use Committee did not meet this month.  Nothing to report.
  • Stanton Street have not been able to meet with the police.  The police are not able to commit at this time because they are busy with the protests.
  • Livability committee: Adopt a Block is the focus at this point. Do $100 gift certificate drawing quarterly for individuals who are doing the Adopt A Block.  Sue will talk with Jodi about how to connect the committee more closely with the Board.  Jimmy stated he feels like he is stuck and not making progress with the Blazers. Jere gave Jimmy a list of names and an email chain but he does not know those individuals.  He does not want to contact someone he has not been introduced to.  Jimmy is trying to get support from the Board so he can do his job. Karla Gosnell has had the most recent contact with the Blazers but we don’t know if her contact is even still with the Blazers.  Who can make this connection?  Sue will reach out to Karla to make a connection with Jimmy and the Blazers
  • Jere is stepping down from the board.  She does not feel she can make the time commitment. 
  • Allan listened into the Emanuel Displaced Persons 2 Zoom call.  They are a group of descendants of the un-kept promises from that era. EDP2 is asking the Eliot Neighborhood Association to sign onto a letter that would negate the current process for the Hill Block.  Jimmy stated that Emanuel has not followed through on their promises.  He also pointed out that there are Blacks fighting against Blacks, both groups have ancestors who were affected by the displacements.  As a neighborhood association we have asked for more land to be donated. What is our goal? Jimmy suggested that we need to protect our name and not put our name on anything until we know it is right. Shireen suggested that Byrd come to another meeting to clarify. Some people in the group decided to stay out of the conflict between the two groups. Shireen did not agree with this decision.
  • April Minutes: Allan moved the minutes be approved as corrected, Sue seconded. Motion passed.
  • May Minutes: Allan moved that the minutes be approved as corrected., Jonathan seconded. Motion passed.

Meeting adjourned at 8:50

Eliot Neighborhood Association Board Meeting Agenda 7/20/2020 6:30pm

Chairs: Allan Rudwick and Jimmy Wilson

Monday, July 20 6:30-8:00

Zoom link

1 Welcome & Introductions (6:30pm)

2 Gladys McCoy Memorial – Hilary Mackenzie

Time certain – 7pm – Dawson Park update

4. Dialogue about racism – Angela Kremer 

5. Old Business/Updates:  
 – Land Use (I-5, neighborhood greenways)
 – Livability – down to 1 member – Treasurer – Recruiting – we need more people! All committees have been losing folks and not replacing over the past year or two.

6. Approve amended minutes from June’s meeting

To Our Community from the Eliot Neighborhood Association Board

The Eliot Neighborhood Association (ENA) stands in solidarity with the Black community and supports the recent protests denouncing police violence. George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, Ahmaud Arbery, and countless others – These tragedies now add to the staggering number of Black lives taken unjustly by a country which continues to devalue those lives. Their names and their stories matter. Their lives matter. Black lives matter.

In these times, as an institution that has worked with the City of Portland in maintaining systems of white supremacy, it is critical that we turn the lens onto ourselves and ask how we have been and how we are complicit, and what we will do to fix that. Knowing that a neighborhood association has an outsized voice in the zoning process in the City of Portland and that those decisions can help build or destroy wealth in our community, it is incredibly important that we take this task seriously. Because neighborhood associations and the public outreach processes that our representatives engage in are spaces that can exclude Black voices, these processes have prevented Black residents from receiving the same opportunities as their white counterparts. 

As a result, we are committed to using our roles as leaders in the community not only to facilitate the necessary conversations but also to work towards community dialogues that are inherently anti-racist. The Eliot Neighborhood Association believes neighborhood associations can be for the greater good and can raise issues in ways that will be good for all residents.

Moving forward, the Eliot Neighborhood Association will continue to try to have Black representation on our board and our Land Use committee in addition to other committees in our neighborhood. We are committed to empowering those that are often left out of critical conversations. Additionally, we are always looking for new members and have open seats for those who would want to get engaged. We are continuously looking for articles for the Eliot News that amplify marginalized voices and we encourage more submissions that do so.

Neighborhood Associations are far from the most important conversation right now in a time when communities are grieving. However, as leaders of this institution, we have the responsibility to use our position to advocate for the Black community. We will donate $1000 to the Black Resilience Fund.

Sincerely,

The Eliot Neighborhood Association Board of Directors

Do you burn wood in Multnomah County? Survey responses needed by 7/13/20

Multnomah County Office of Sustainability has asked the Eliot Neighborhood Association to share this message:

Multnomah County’s Office of Sustainability has received a DEQ grant to implement a community campaign about health and wood smoke. The goal of the campaign is to promote clean air and reduce wood smoke in the county. 

They are in the early stages of brainstorming and would appreciate feedback about wood burning. 

If you burn wood, this 10 minute survey will help inform our 2020-2021 Wood Smoke Campaign. Please fill out by midnight Monday, July 13th for a chance to win one of four $25 Fred Meyer gift cards. 

Please reach out to sustainability@multco.us with any questions or concerns. Thank you!

Land Use and Transportation Committee

Agenda July 13th, 2020

7:00-8:00 pm

Zoom Meeting Link

Zoom Meeting ID: 93542711253

Zoom Password: 747204

  1. 7:00 Open meeting, Welcome guests, Introductions (5 mins)
  2. 7:05 Discuss agenda and accept any additions (5)
  3. 7:10 Neighborhood Greenways Discussion (30) 
  4. 7:40 I-5 Expansion Update (10)
  5. 7:50 Discuss upcoming projects and if we want to get involved (5)
  6. 7:55 Approve Minutes (5)

Randall Children’s Hospital nationally recognized for excellence in surgery

By Kristin Whitney

The American College of Surgeons (ACS) has verified Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel as a Level 1 Children’s Surgery Center, making it one of two children’s surgical centers in Oregon to earn this prestigious validation.  

The Level 1 surgical verification was awarded because of Randall Children’s high-quality pediatric-specific surgical services, multidisciplinary team of world-class pediatric specialists and holistic approach to children’s surgery. Previously, Randall Children’s was the first hospital in Oregon and the first children’s hospital in the Pacific Northwest to receive the Level 1 pediatric trauma center verification by American College of Surgeons in 2017. 

“From the beginning, Randall Children’s Hospital was built with the needs of children and families in mind,” said Bronwyn Houston, president of Randall Children’s Hospital. “Randall Children’s treats over 100,000 children a year, and this achievement in pediatric surgery highlights the hospital’s expertise in providing the highest level of comprehensive care possible for every child.”

Randall Children’s is one of 21 surgical centers in the nation to achieve this elite verification from the American College of Surgeons. The process is rigorous, requiring surgical centers to meet essential criteria for staffing, training, and facility infrastructure and protocols for children’s care.

“Kids have unique physical and emotional needs,” said Cindy Gingalewski, M.D., medical director of children’s surgical services. “If your child requires surgery, you want to know that at every step of the way they are being treated by leading pediatric specialists who are committed to providing the highest quality care tailored for children.”

Some requirements and attributes of an ACS-CSV-verified pediatric surgical program include:

  • Pediatric-trained specialists including surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, radiologists and intensivists who are available to care for children 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Children’s specialty surgeons in pediatric orthopedic surgery, pediatric neurosurgery, congenital heart surgery, pediatric plastic surgery, pediatric ophthalmology, pediatric otolaryngology and pediatric urology are required in Level 1 children’s surgical centers.  
  • Dedicated resources to take care of the most complex pediatric conditions.
  • Providing leadership in education to families, community pediatricians, and emergency personnel.
  • Participation in a national data registry that yields semiannual reports of quality for processes and outcomes and identifies opportunities for continuous quality improvements.
  • A robust research program that brings evidence-based science into clinical practice at the bedside.

Randall Children’s participates in ongoing performance improvement efforts to ensure each patient experiences the best possible surgical outcome from the emergency department to the inpatient rehabilitation program. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, Randall Children’s is known for its excellent communication with referring pediatricians and families.

The American College of Surgeons is a scientific and educational association of surgeons that was founded in 1913 to improve the quality of care for the surgical patient by setting high standards for surgical education and practice. Longstanding achievements have placed the ACS in the forefront of American surgery and have made it an important advocate for all surgical patients.

About Legacy Health

Legacy Health is a locally owned, nonprofit health system driven by our mission to improve the health of those around us. We offer a unique blend of health services – from wellness and urgent care to dedicated children’s care and advanced medical centers – to care for patients of all ages when and where they need us across the Portland/Vancouver metro area and mid-Willamette Valley. With an eye toward a healthier community, our partnerships tackle vital issues such as housing and mental health. Legacy strives to help everyone live healthier and better lives, with the vision of being essential to the health of the region. For more information, visit www.legacyhealth.org.

Are you ready for the Big One? Earthquake Tech to the rescue!

Steve Gemmell, the owner of Earthquake Tech, unexpectedly learned about seismic retrofitting 20 years ago. After getting out of college and living life as a ski bum in Colorado for a year, he was painting and refurbishing houses and ended up getting his contractor’s license. He bought his first fixer home in Portland in 1995 which was happened to be a real fixer-upper. Steve’s dad was familiar with the Cascadia Subduction Zone and suggested he get earthquake insurance. State Farm Insurance issued the policy with no questions asked. 

Fast forward to 1999 when Steve went to buy his second home and again approached State Farm to write the earthquake policy. They asked if the house was bolted down to the foundation.  Not familiar with the process, he talked to an engineer who explained to him how to make the right connections for the house. He bolted that house down to its foundation and was able qualify for the insurance policy.  An idea for a business was born… So why specialize in the retrofitting business? Steve says, “Seismic retrofitting requires way less trips to the hardware store compared to other construction/remodeling projects. I know exactly what I need and have all supplies at the ready which makes for a very efficient job.”

Seeing the importance of spreading the word for seismic reinforcement, Steve marketed his business to State Farm and the agents, in turn, would refer their insurance customers to Steve. Twenty years later, Earthquake Tech still markets to all insurance companies, home inspectors, real estate agents, and business associations, as well as offering continuing education to all those business segments and their agents.

“Earthquake Tech specializes in residential and commercial seismic retrofitting. We also run a group out of our headquarters called the Portland Resiliency Plan, a community effort bringing the message of preparedness to all walks of life and age groups in the city of Portland,” says Steve. Besides seismic retrofitting, Earthquake Tech offers many other services including full commercial and residential seismic upgrades, installation of basement staircases, egress windows and doors, staircase doors, and emergency gas shut off valves.

Earthquake Tech has recently purchased the building at 2310 N Kerby Ave just off N Russell Street and will host events here soon. Future events planned are Earthquake Tech sponsored talks by Steven Eberlein from Tipping Point Resilience on the Cascadia Subduction and earthquake preparedness. The Portland Resiliency Plan will also offer a program for business owners about creating resiliency plans/emergency plans after an earthquake, ice storm, etc.

 Many homeowners are seeing the value of retrofitting their homes and more businesses are also seeing the benefit because of the liability if an earthquake would cause damage and injury in an unreinforced building. So if you are concerned about the safety and resiliency of your home or building, want to talk about preparing your home or business for safety, or have questions about what steps to take, Earthquake Tech is the company to contact with their 20 years of experience. Check out their website for helpful information and tips, email for more information, or give them a call – the safety of your future may depend on it.

Earthquake Tech

2310 N Kerby Ave

503-282-4424 

Earthquaketech.com

contact@earthquaketech.com

Eliot Neighborhood Welcomes New Veterinary Practice

By Alex Simpson

In January 2020,  Grateful Heart Veterinary Hospital started providing North and Northeast Portland with the highest quality, compassionate, and cutting-edge veterinary care.  Dr Katy Felton and her team opened a small animal practice at 3334 North Vancouver Ave. There is a rear entrance and ample parking at 107 N. Cook St, Suite B, right across from New Seasons and Mud Bay stores.

Dr. Felton’s focus is on comprehensive whole-life care of cats and dogs.  With over 13 years in practice, including her role as Medical Director of a thriving Portland clinic, Dr. Felton practices caring, high-touch, and customized medical care.She loves surgery and dentistry, and is a certified canine rehabilitation practitioner, bringing her care of seniors, athletes and pets recovering from procedures to a new level. She is bringing Portland’s best certified team of vet care professionals with her to North Portland. The entire staff is Fear Free Certified, dedicated to making veterinary visits as low stress as possible for pets and their families.

Stop by the clinic in January, visit our website at www.gratefulheartvethospital.com, or call us at 503-813-2050 to meet our team, see our vision, and share in the best veterinary experience possible.  We think anyone who loves their pets as much as we do will enjoy the gorgeous space, culture, and phenomenal care we’re bringing to North Portland and the Eliot neighborhood.