Historic Homes Headed for Demolition

623Thompson

There are two 125-year-old houses in Eliot that are going to be demolished if the neighborhood doesn’t rally to save them. The best option would be to purchase them from the developer who owns them, Guy Bryant of GPB Construction, or failing that, to convince him not to tear them down to build his ultramodern 40-foot-tall rowhouses that, needless to say, don’t fit in to the neighborhood. The houses were built at the time the City of Albina was its own city.

Continue reading Historic Homes Headed for Demolition

Advertisements

The John Antonio House

Historic Homes & Buildings: The John Antonio House
The Second Oldest House in Eliot

The John Antonio House
The John Antonio House on NE Tillamook with snow in January 2007

There is one small old house tucked away inside our architecturally diverse neighborhood that could escape being noticed during a walk. It is not a fancy Victorian-era house loaded with gingerbread but a simple cottage with a shallow bay window in front. The Antonio Cottage can be found in the middle of the block on the south aide of NE Tillamook between Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. and NE 7th Avenue at number 528. The house sits on one of the earliest blocks developed when the “Townsite of Albina” was laid out in 1873. Research has revealed that this is the second oldest structure known in our neighborhood.

Continue reading The John Antonio House

Churches of Eliot: A historical resource

By Jason Franklin

ChurchMap
A number of churches were built in the neighborhood around the turn of the 20th century

The churches of Eliot are a rich historic and cultural asset to the neighborhood. There are at least ten churches in the neighborhood today and most were built in the early 1900’s with Immaculate Heart dating to 1889.

Continue reading Churches of Eliot: A historical resource

1890 Home Slated for Destruction

The Edwin Rayworth House - Built in 1890
The Edwin Rayworth House – Built in 1890

The Edwin Rayworth House

Another historic home in the Boise neighborhood nearby Eliot at 3605 N Albina is slated for demolition. A developer from Lake Oswego intends to replace this classic vintage home with a bland modern 2-family structure with a property split down the middle of the lot. This Queen Anne styled home is not a fancy Victorian era mansion but a decorative cottage, typical for a middle-classed resident in 1890. At the time this house was built, the Eliot, Boise, and King neighborhoods were within the limits of the City of Albina, consolidated by the City of Portland one year later.

Continue reading 1890 Home Slated for Destruction

Eliot from Above Then and Now

Aerial View of Eliot Neighborhood 1955

1955 Aerial View of Eliot

Houses, houses, houses! In 1955 houses dominated the landscape in Eliot. This view of Eliot from above was taken as part of a larger photo of the downtown area.  The image shows the neighborhood before the massive changes that came in the 60’s and 70’s. Memorial Coliseum had not yet been built, I-5 had not yet tore through the neighborhood, the Emanual Hospital campus had not yet sprawled into the neighborhood and Fremont was just a street (not quite in the picture) and not also a bridge.  Also worth noticing, Lower Albina still had homes, Albina park was square, the grid pattern covered most of the area, and the now vacant lots around Russell near Williams and Vancouver had buildings.

Continue reading Eliot from Above Then and Now

Eliot Neighborhood Street Names

We live and work on them. We  walk, bicycle, and drive on them, but how many of us know the history behind the streets of Eliot? Here, with help from the book Portland Names and Neighborhoods: Their Historical Origins, by Eugene E Snyder (Binford and Mort, 1979) are the stories of some of the neighborhood’s more well known streets.

Continue reading Eliot Neighborhood Street Names

Eliot Neighborhood Trivia

Questions:

Q1: What still in use structure on MLK had a bit part in a 1993 sleeper hit? What was the building? What was the movie? Bonus: What two word line (arguably one of the best in the movie) was uttered by an extra in that scene?

Q2: What used to be at the site of the Nike outlet store? What happened to it?

Q3: What is the name of the park adjoining Tubman School, and why is it hyphenated?

Continue reading Eliot Neighborhood Trivia

Oral History Walking Tour

By Kayla Gill

A page from the tour booklet

Allies of Eliot, a group of eight PSU community development students, has produced a historic walking tour of Eliot based on a series of interviews conducted by the Eliot Oral Histories Project and on community outreach conducted for the walking tour.  The tour is self-guided and consists of an informational booklet with historical photos, and corresponding audio tracks taken from the interviews. Booklets and audio players will be available for checkout from Dishman Community Center, where the tour begins and ends.  A condensed brochure version of the booklet and audio mp3s will be available for free download from the project website this summer.

Continue reading Oral History Walking Tour

“Allies of Eliot” Continue The Oral History Project

By Owen Wise-Pierik

Allies Of Eliot

The history of the Eliot Neighborhood has been something that has brought culture and identity to it’s residents for a long time. It is something of controversy, life, and community. However, the neighborhood is changing. In order to keep the legacy of Eliot alive, Laurie Simpson and Arlie Sommer have teamed up with a group of Community Development undergraduate students from Portland State University to create an oral history project for the Eliot Neighborhood. Fusing together informational interviews of long term residents in Eliot and historical research, the students will create a historical walking tour of the neighborhood, bringing out oral narratives to show the changes and the history that exists here.

Continue reading “Allies of Eliot” Continue The Oral History Project

Robert E. Menefee: Profile of an Albina Businessman & Resident

During the early years of rapid development in the town of Albina, which most of is now inside the Eliot neighborhood, many well-known businessmen were involved with the process.  When Albina was incorporated in 1887, it saw phenomenal growth through 1892.  Much money was spent and made on real estate investments and industrial expansions tied into the railroad industry.  Businesses during these years thrived on healthy profits in part due to an abundant supply of immigrant workers willing to work at working-class wages.  The real estate market was exceptionally healthy due to soaring lot prices.  After Albina merged with Portland in 1891, the value of property skyrocketed.  Most Albina businessmen and property speculators though lived in today’s NW and SW Portland, which was generally where most of the “well-to-do” lived.  Robert E. Menefee and his brothers were an exception to this rule as they resided in Albina during most of their lives.  Some of the homes they lived in are still standing in the neighborhood today.

16 NE Tillamook, oldest surviving house where Menefee lived with his father from 1890 to 1892.

Continue reading Robert E. Menefee: Profile of an Albina Businessman & Resident

Eliot Oral History Project

Written By Laurie Simpson

Boise Eliot student Anthony Brown during an interview

The Eliot Oral History Project has concluded their spring interview series.  The project, sponsored by the Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods and the Eliot Neighborhood Association, brought elders together with students from Boise Eliot’s middle school class to record stories about the Eliot Neighborhood.

Students were asked to reflect on the experience.  Here is what they said:

Continue reading Eliot Oral History Project

A Little Bit Of Norway in Eliot

Queen Anne Cottages on NE Rodney. Circa 2000.

The residents of Eliot are fortunate today to enjoy ethnic and cultural diversity. What is more unique about our neighborhood is that it was always diverse since the beginning, during the last quarter of the 19th Century.  A healthy mix of immigrants from Europe settled here and built homes.  In the northerly portion of the original town site of Albina, which is bounded by today’s NE Morris Street west of MLK & NE Ivy Street east of MLK, a higher concentration of settlers from Scandinavian countries purchased property and built homes for themselves and related family members.  Most of these men held a variety of occupations that were often unskilled, but they were well-taught and highly skilled in carpentry.  Luckily, clusters of these small but decorative houses stand today and some have been sensitively restored.

Continue reading A Little Bit Of Norway in Eliot

Oral History Project Starting

The Eliot Neighborhood Association and Boise-Eliot School are about to begin the Eliot Oral History Project!  This project will bring Boise-Eliot middle school students together with Eliot residents to listen and record their stories and piece together an oral history and walking tours of the neighborhood.

Continue reading Oral History Project Starting

A Review of Jumptown

When most people think of jazz, Portland, Oregon, is not the first place that comes to mind.  And yet, for a golden decade following World War II, the Eliot neighborhood, a thriving African American neighborhood that would soon be bulldozed for urban renewal, spawned a jazz heyday.  Such luminaries as: Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Oscar Peterson, Dave Brubeck, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Dizzie Gillespie, Louis Armstrong, and local talent; Wardell Gray and Doc Severinsen headlined Portland clubs.  The fact that Portland was a port city with a busy railroad, and had a bustling shipbuilding industry, made it ripe to become a jazz Mecca.  Jumptown, by Robert Dietsche is a fascinating blend of music, politics, and social history.

Continue reading A Review of Jumptown