Historic Martin Mayo House Slated for Demolition

Historical black and white photo of Martin Mayo house in 1929
Historic Martin Mayo house in 1929

The Eliot neighborhood may soon be losing an historic resource, a cute house with a unique curved front porch connected to a man who dedicated much of his life to the community over one hundred years ago.  The house now at 206 NE Sacramento Street is a little bit tucked away behind shrubbery on a double-sized lot and proposed to be replaced by bland modern higher density housing.  The current owner, Danielle Isenhart of Emerio Design based in Beaverton, filed a demolition permit earlier this spring and was approved on May 4th.  The one condition posed by the city was a demolition delay of 120 days to provide a possible alternative to the destruction of a historic resource.

Continue reading Historic Martin Mayo House Slated for Demolition

Advertisements

Help Stop Demolition of Martin Mayo House

Martin Mayo House
Martin Mayo House in 2018. Photo by Sue Stringer

You can help stop the demolition of 206 NE Sacramento and its urban forest garden. The surrounding community is organizing a petition and appeal to save this historic house and edible forest garden from proposed development.

Continue reading Help Stop Demolition of Martin Mayo House

Emanuel Apologizes

Urban Renewal Exhibit at Emanual Hospital
Urban Renewal Exhibit at Emanual

In a season already fraught with bad news – Arkansas executions, skyrocketing arms sales, more black teenagers shot by police – a page-8 headline in the last issue of Eliot News stopped me cold:  “Major Expansion Project Planned for Legacy Emanuel Medical Center Campus.”  For me, those 10 words echoed the hospital “expansion” that dismantled the last of Eliot’s African-American community, 44 years ago.

Continue reading Emanuel Apologizes

C. Mebus House Demolished

2318 Rodney
C Mebus house just before final demolition

Another historic single family home in Eliot was demolished back in July. At the same time the large old trees were removed leaving a flat, barren lot. The house sat at 2318 NE Rodney and according to a neighbor was occupied by the same family for a very very long time.  It had fallen into disrepair over the last 25 or so years. However, like most houses that have been erased from the neighborhood, it is very likely it could have been salvaged and restored into a great starter home for a new family.

Continue reading C. Mebus House Demolished

Micro Apartments to Replace House

3116 N Vancouver will soon be demolished.
3116 N Vancouver will soon be demolished.

As required by the Portland Zoning Code,  Architect Rich Brooks, CIDA and developer Ben McInnis, BENCO initiated contact with the Eliot Land Use and Transportation Committee and presented their plans to build a 5-story micro unit apartment building at 3116 N. Vancouver Ave.  The building with a footprint of 36’x44’ will have eighteen 250 sq ft micro apartments expected to rent at between $866 – $898/ unit.

Continue reading Micro Apartments to Replace House

Larrabee and Albina Then and Now

The Albina Building 1927

The Albina Building, Larrabee and Albina, 1927.  Portland Archives A2009-009.2471.
The Albina Building, Larrabee and Albina, 1927. Portland Archives A2009-009.2471.

This building on the corner of Larrabee (Interstate) and Albina was originally built as a hotel in the late 1890’s or early 1900’s.  The building looks like it was a triangle, however it was actually shaped like a “V”.  At the top of the building, over the corner entrance, are the words “The Albina”.  It appears there is additional text above in the shadows, but it is unreadable – or perhaps it is ornamentation.  In 1929, The Albina was home to the “Ideal Cafeteria” and the “Baxter Apartments”.

Continue reading Larrabee and Albina Then and Now

Historic Homes Headed for Demolition

623Thompson

There are two 125-year-old houses in Eliot that are going to be demolished if the neighborhood doesn’t rally to save them. The best option would be to purchase them from the developer who owns them, Guy Bryant of GPB Construction, or failing that, to convince him not to tear them down to build his ultramodern 40-foot-tall rowhouses that, needless to say, don’t fit in to the neighborhood. The houses were built at the time the City of Albina was its own city.

Continue reading Historic Homes Headed for Demolition

Momentum Builds to Stop the Demolition

Stop the Demolition Sign

All around Portland signs are showing up in front yards with the purpose of stopping the demolition of Portland homes.  With the upturn in the economy developers are in full swing looking for any opportunity they can to tear down a house and build something new.  Now is the time for residents to act to save our historic homes.

Continue reading Momentum Builds to Stop the Demolition

Update on the Rayworth House

Rayworth House 2005
The Edwin Rayworth House (2005)

In October 2012, developer Andre Kashuba purchased the Historic Rayworth House property located at 3605 N Albina in the nearby Boise neighborhood. He immediately filed plans with the city to demolish the existing 1890 single-family house and construct two attached larger homes on the lot. Around November, the city granted approval with a new proposed lot line splitting the property down the middle. In recent years, it has been a primary goal to encourage increased population density in close-in neighborhoods. Even though the Rayworth House is in the middle of a block of single-family homes between N Fremont and N Beech, most of the area is zoned for two families per lot, which explains the short of approval time by the city.

Continue reading Update on the Rayworth House

1890 Home Slated for Destruction

The Edwin Rayworth House - Built in 1890
The Edwin Rayworth House – Built in 1890

The Edwin Rayworth House

Another historic home in the Boise neighborhood nearby Eliot at 3605 N Albina is slated for demolition. A developer from Lake Oswego intends to replace this classic vintage home with a bland modern 2-family structure with a property split down the middle of the lot. This Queen Anne styled home is not a fancy Victorian era mansion but a decorative cottage, typical for a middle-classed resident in 1890. At the time this house was built, the Eliot, Boise, and King neighborhoods were within the limits of the City of Albina, consolidated by the City of Portland one year later.

Continue reading 1890 Home Slated for Destruction

Eliot from Above Then and Now

Aerial View of Eliot Neighborhood 1955

1955 Aerial View of Eliot

Houses, houses, houses! In 1955 houses dominated the landscape in Eliot. This view of Eliot from above was taken as part of a larger photo of the downtown area.  The image shows the neighborhood before the massive changes that came in the 60’s and 70’s. Memorial Coliseum had not yet been built, I-5 had not yet tore through the neighborhood, the Emanual Hospital campus had not yet sprawled into the neighborhood and Fremont was just a street (not quite in the picture) and not also a bridge.  Also worth noticing, Lower Albina still had homes, Albina park was square, the grid pattern covered most of the area, and the now vacant lots around Russell near Williams and Vancouver had buildings.

Continue reading Eliot from Above Then and Now

An 1883 House on the Endangered List

216 NE Tillamook
216 NE Tillamook

The Eliot neighborhood may soon be losing a historic home at 216 NE Tillamook. A demolition permit was filed by the company who purchased it two years ago but the city required a 120-day demolition delay on the house due to the fact that it is inside a historic zone and the age of the house. The delay is designed to provide some opportunity for someone to move the house to another location and restore it. Fortunately for the house, the owning firm who planned a condominium development on the site had financial problems and the property entered foreclosure recently.

Continue reading An 1883 House on the Endangered List

Walling Building Bites the Dust

Walling Building - 1930s
Walling Building - 1930s

Eliot lost a historic building in October 2007, but to the relief of some residents as it had been an eyesore in recent years. The two story wood framed structure was at 2240-2248 NE MLK on the corner of NE Sacramento. Over the last 50 years, it suffered insensitive alterations and neglect. In its last years, structural problems became more apparent as the elements took a toll on the exterior. It was the last of several turreted Victorian structures that formerly lined a busy Union Avenue (MLK today) during the 1890s. Under the present ownership, a future new mixed use building is planned for the site since it is a prime location for retail development.

Continue reading Walling Building Bites the Dust