Letter from the Co-Chair

As I went for a walk last night, I was breathing in wildfire smoke. These are not normal times. I keep hearing calls to vote, as if our problems are political in nature. Society is not what it once was. As someone who likes to host friends, I am finding myself struggling to maintain my social connections during the time of covid-19. 

I worry about our organization, the Eliot Neighborhood Association (ENA). Our roles in my time with the ENA have been:

  • To organize and put out the Eliot News (a huge task). 
  • To be a space to discuss neighborhood issues, development proposals, city projects and plans, and advocate for a better future
  • To put on annual events like a neighborhood cleanup
  • To be a resource for neighbors needing help navigating the city’s bureaucracy

Recently, our organization is feeling depleted. We have been continuing to meet over zoom, but we are not really able to have an easily accessible open door for a community space. As a result, we are not gaining members and seeing as much of the public as we normally would. Many of our members have stepped down from positions and committees, more than I have seen in my 10 years with the ENA. We need your help! 


These times are trying. The national political partisanship combined with a sense that things just are not being taken care of at a local or national level is wearing on many of us. Technology companies are getting better at keeping our attention on scrolling or watching movies and we aren’t going out and making as many connections in the world as we might otherwise. 

The most important connections we can make are with those around us. I have also found that during the pandemic, I am making stronger connections with my neighbors who live right next to me than I have ever had. These are the people who I’ll turn to first for help out if something goes wrong. I would encourage you to connect with those around you. The ENA has your back and is here for larger issues, but the easiest solutions come neighbor to neighbor. Spending more time at home has made me realize that I am blessed to live on a great block. You might find that you are too.

Letter from the Chair – A Call to Action

Hello Neighbors,

Eliot is in the bullseye of diesel particulate pollution. This is due partly to our proximity to I-5 and I-84, but also to MLK, which is a truck route, and the N Williams/N Vancouver corridor. All these roads carry dirty diesel trucks every day. Oregon allows unfiltered diesel trucks on our roads. This is dangerous for us because the National Institute of Health says “the health effects of diesel exhaust emissions… acute effects of diesel exhaust exposure include irritation of the nose and eyes, lung function changes, respiratory changes, headache, fatigue, and nausea. Chronic exposures are associated with cough, sputum production, and lung function decrements.” And… “Continuous exposure to diesel exhaust fumes can cause long term, or chronic, respiratory ill health with symptoms including coughing and feeling breathless. At worst, if people are exposed to diesel engine exhaust fumes regularly and over a long period, there is an increased risk of getting lung cancer.” ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/11401072/

Since Eliot has LONG been affected by diesel AND has tried several times to get legislation or regulation on pollution, long term neighbors wonder what’s different this time.

Well, a few factors have changed. The Oregon Legislature is finally taking up this issue this term. Our neighbors to the east have all converged to focus the legislature’s attention because of new data from the lichen study, PSU scientists, the ODOT I-5 expansion proposal, the Willamette Superfund recent movement toward resolution, the Volkswagen settlement and, yes, opening of Harriett Tubman Middle School. See HB 2007 “The Diesel Bill”.  

(https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B1dBPerjxQcmUHVpZXk1UXFUemsycEFnV3dIZmMwcEpob0dR)

The Eliot Neighborhood Association is joining local neighborhood and advocacy group efforts to take action. For this effort, we need committed people of any skill level. We are looking for residents or anyone working in Eliot.  Our Board needs you to help us form a strong, inclusive, passionate team to advocate for stronger, sooner regulations, and also to help local businesses gain access to the $50,000,000 ODOT funds, which are available for small under-represented trucking owners. ENA has created a new committee, eACT, Eliot Advocacy for Clean-air Team. This Team will meet the 2nd or 3rd week of July. If you want to join us contact me at chair at eliotneighborhood dot org

See Environmental Advocacy for Clean-Air Team: Eliot eACT. 

Information from the Chair

SAVE THE DATE: October 17, 2017.

Eliot Neighborhood Association General Meeting and Community Conversation. It’s time to check in with the constituents. If we call it a Town Hall Meeting, will you come?

These are important times for democracy at all levels. Even in a State where our Federal representatives are strong and carry the support of most citizens, at the local community level YOUR VOICE is, also, needed. Clean air, clean water, safe streets, affordable housing……. All need your attention.

Did you know:

Continue reading Information from the Chair

Letter from the Board Chair

I love living in Eliot Neighborhood. I love the proximity to shops, restaurants and services. I love being near the River for walking and enjoying beautiful views. But mostly I love running into people I know and how easy it is to get to know neighbors. People are friendly and helpful. I’m looking forward to all the outdoor events over the summer (see Spring-Summer Events 2016) where I’m sure to meet folks I know.

Continue reading Letter from the Board Chair

Letter from the Chairs

In November 2015, Patricia Montgomery and I were elected co-chairs of the Eliot Neighborhood Association Board.

Patricia Montgomery is a native Oregonian but has lived in Eliot for 26 years, working and raising her children.  Her favorite things about the neighborhood are the accessibility to the city, the diversity of the neighborhood and the sense of a caring community. When she’s not working Patricia volunteers at her church, St. Philip the Deacon, at Rodney and Knott Street, where the ENA, Eliot Neighborhood Association meetings are held.

Continue reading Letter from the Chairs

Up Close and Personal: Angela Kremer

Angela Kremer at her Victorian house
Angela Kremer at her Victorian house

“It’s a work in progress,” Angela Kremer says of the interior paint of her home. Like many residents of Eliot she and her husband chose the location in part because of its affordability relative to other close-in Portland neighborhoods. She spotted the three bedroom Victorian house on the corner of Rodney and Hancock in 1998 when she was riding by on her bike. “It needed a lot of work, but I just fell in love with it. It really appealed to me to fix it up and make it something that people could enjoy from the outside.”

Continue reading Up Close and Personal: Angela Kremer

Vacancy at the top

There comes a time in every chairperson’s life when they realize that they don’t want to have this job forever. As of right now, I have been acting as the newsletter editor in addition to being the chair of the neighborhood. The last person who held both of these roles, Clint Lundmark, has done a good job illustrating to me that this is not a sustainable amount of work for one neighbor to shoulder.

Continue reading Vacancy at the top

What good is a neighborhood association?

In Portland, we have a unique way of governing our city. With a mayor and 4 city commissioners, elections and politics can be interesting, but there are some other quirks.  One is our Office of Neighborhood Involvement (ONI) and the neighborhood system. Eliot is a member of the Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods (NECN), which receives ONI and other funding to voice concerns from northeast Portland.

Continue reading What good is a neighborhood association?