Cartside PDX– Tap House and More Carts Now Open for Business

We reported in the summer issue that a new food cart pod had opened on N Williams and Hancock. At that time only a couple of carts were open and we were anxiously awaiting more carts and also the tap house to start serving. Well, that time has come. Each have different hours so check them out or give them a call.  They are all listed in the Dining in Eliot list to the right. Check out their website for more information and menus at  https://www.cartsidepdx.com/

Lots of options at Cartside the new food cart pod on N Williams at NE Hancock

The following carts have joined the pod:

  • L’Unico Italian Street Food
  • Poblano Pepper Mexican Food
  • Yaba Yabaa Mediterranean
  • Ko Sisters Korean Soul Food
  • Let’s Roll Sushi PDX
  • Smaaken Waffle Sandwiches
  • PP Thai Food Cart

The Cartside Tap House is also now open 7 days a week from 11:30 am —7:00 pm and serving up beer, cider and wine with 25 different beers and ciders on tap.

Check them all out-  there’s lots of great food and drink to enjoy!

COVID-19 From One Black Perspective

By Monique Gaskins

This year has not gone as expected. I’ve hesitated to address our country’s current situation because there are so many different issues impacting us right now. In Portland, there won’t be a return to normality for the foreseeable future. Many people are struggling with feelings of anxiety, our economic indicators show vast discrepancies across socioeconomic groups, we are still in the midst of a global pandemic– with limitations to our physical movements and social interactions, and underneath everything, is a widespread awakening to the struggles and injustices that Black people have experienced for hundreds of years. 

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), “Fear and anxiety about a new disease and what could happen can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children.” In other words, while changing our behaviors to lower our risk of exposure to COVID-19, we may also be feeling anxious or stressed. Since we are practicing social distancing to help lower our exposure risk and opportunities to spread the disease to others, we might be isolated from our friends, family, religious organizations, and other support systems. For some people, this anxiety and isolation have led to an increase in suicidal thoughts. The CDC finds reports of suicidal ideation to be higher in Hispanic and Black individuals than in the general population. As neighbors and friends, we can respond to these facts by intentionally checking in on friends and family. 

Unsurprisingly, the increase in uncertainty has manifested itself in the economic realm too. Unemployment rates are significantly higher than they were earlier this year. In August, as I write this article, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Oregon’s unemployment rate at 10% for July. In February of this year, before the impact of the Coronavirus became widespread, our unemployment rate was 3%. Oregon’s state legislature has responded with a moratorium on evictions (currently through September 30th) and a six month grace period to pay back rent. This bill should provide some relief to Oregonians impacted by job loss or underemployment this year. Again, Black people might struggle from an outsized impact from job loss. Although Black Americans constitute 13% of the U.S. population, they hold less than 3% of the country’s wealth. Many systemic reasons are contributing to this discrepancy, but the result is that Black people may have a smaller safety net and a more difficult time finding a new job if they are laid off, furloughed, or able to access fewer shifts. 

Systemic racism as demonstrated by police violence and political apathy has played a prominent role in mainstream media this summer. Across our country, Americans can watch recordings of police officers killing Black Americans while suffering few consequences. An organization called Mapping Police Violence measures 751 fatalities from police violence from January 1st to August 24th of this year. Although Black people represent 13% of the United States’ population, they represent 28% of these deaths. Across the country, this has sparked discussions about defunding the police and using that money to instead support social services and other organizations to uplift our communities rather than relying on disciplinary-first tactics. 

The city of Portland’s 2021 budget, including funds for the Portland Police Bureau, was approved even after racial unrest and protests had become more prominent. Although some organizations and city council members supported a more significant cut to the Portland Police Bureau’s budget, only a fraction of that proposed 50 million dollars was re-routed to other parts of the city’s budget. However, Portlanders have dedicated their time and risked their safety to continue to push for changes from the Police Bureau and our city’s leadership.

The impacts of the COVID-19 global pandemic are being felt differently by different parts of our population. Black people are more likely to be negatively impacted in many ways; we are more susceptible to economic instability, more likely to hold jobs that increase exposure risks, and more likely to suffer from the effects of police violence. Through the repeated acts of public violence against Black people, it may feel like society is saying that Black Lives do not matter. Locally, our city’s protests demonstrate empathy for Black Lives from a majority white city. Protesters demonstrate their willingness to risk their safety in solidarity with Black people by showing up nightly and standing against police brutality. Portland’s recurring protests demonstrate that there are people in our communities who are willing to support Black Lives.

I’m a Black Portlander, and this is only my opinion. I’m sure my background is very different from many other Black Portlanders. My perspective cannot represent everyone’s point of view. But, if any of this resonates with you, there are ways for you to provide support. Locally, you can join nightly protests or donate to the Black Resilience Fund or PAALF (Portland African American Leadership Forum). Local organizations, like Black Feast, also support Black joy as their way of resisting the violence and inequality felt by many Black Americans. You can donate to these organizations or support Black-owned businesses and artists here in Portland. 

Across the country, many professors, authors, and artists have shared resources to help us understand racism better. We have options spanning books, articles, movies, and podcasts such as Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson, The 1619 Podcast by the New York Times, and “Where do I donate” by Courtney Martin. We can support national and local elections and get out the vote campaigns. Portland’s next mayor and potential Police Bureau Commissioner will be decided in this cycle along with national leadership. There is no reason for us to sit on the sidelines. This year has not gone as expected. COVID-19 highlights some of our systemic failures and shortcomings. This year has been challenging for so many people; I hope that we can look at our collective weaknesses and take this opportunity to build a more just society.

Sources: 

CDC – stress from coronavirus: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/managing-stress-anxiety.html#:~:text=The%20coronavirus%20disease%202019%20(,services%20you%20rely%20on.

CNN – increase in suicidal thoughts: https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/14/health/young-people-suicidal-ideation-wellness/index.html

Oregon unemployment statistics: https://www.bls.gov/eag/eag.or.htm

Rent moratorium: https://multco.us/chair-kafoury/covid-19-eviction-moratorium-information#:~:text=If%20you%20are%20a%20tenant,for%20nonpayment%20during%20the%20moratorium.&text=Tenants%20will%20have%20a%20six,rent%20from%20the%20moratorium%20period.

NPR – Black Americans and Covid 19: https://www.npr.org/2020/06/03/868469779/black-americans-bear-the-brunt-of-the-covid-19-pandemics-economic-impact

Mapping police violence: https://mappingpoliceviolence.org/

Paalf defund police: https://www.paalf.org/defund

Police budget: https://www.oregonlive.com/portland/2020/06/portland-passes-budget-with-millions-in-cuts-to-police-spending-but-short-of-public-demand-for-50-million-reduction.html

Resources:

Where do I donate: https://thebolditalic.com/where-do-i-donate-why-is-the-uprising-violent-should-i-go-protest-5cefeac37ef9

Just Mercy: https://justmercy.eji.org/

1619 Podcast: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/23/podcasts/1619-podcast.html

Eliot Neighborhood Association General Member Meeting Agenda 10/19/2020 6:30pm

Chairs: Jimmy Wilson and Allan Rudwick

Monday, October 19 6:30-8:00

Zoom link

(or for audio only, call +1 669-900-6833, Meeting ID: 891 8010 0204,
Passcode: 253756)

1 Welcome & Introductions (6:30pm)

2 Neighborhood Update

3 Board Elections – Choose Directors for the Coming year

4. Old Business/Updates  

5. Approve amended minutes from September’s meeting

Boise Eliot Native Grove Update

By Andrine de la Rocha

Hello, Grove Friends!

Here in our third summer, the Grove is looking incredibly lush. As the shrubs grow to fill (and overfill!) their allotted areas, the vegetative contours of the Grove are starting to really look the way we imagined them when we first began. The Willow Dome is rebounding well from the bizarre massive water-main flood of last summer, and we seem to be attracting not just bees but dragonflies and birds of many species. Thank you so much for all your incredible help in making our dream a reality.

Now we’re thinking about a few equipment upgrades, and hope y’all might be able to kick in a little financial support.  

When we first began watering the Grove, we dragged our expensive hose across the street and discovered that auto traffic ruptured and destroyed the unprotected hose.  For the last couple of years, we’ve protected the hose with four 2” x 12” boards which are huge and heavy (as our Watering Heroes can attest to). They’ve done a great job, but are splintering, cracking, and breaking under the stress.

We’d need some actual hose ramps to protect them, which should both a) do a better job, b) last longer, and c) be much easier to drag out into the street and back. The ones we looked at are black rubber with a bright yellow lid, rated for 20-30 tons per axle, which should stand up even to the garbage and delivery trucks that occasionally traverse the hose.

Six 3’4” pieces, at $46 each, – 8% bulk discount, free shipping, = $254. 

The tripod for our sprinkler has done good service, but one of the legs is broken: the clip that holds it in extended position no longer works. Replacement tripod = $40

We also need a couple of bags of concrete to set the ceramic bird/bee bath in place, AND one of our really good hoses just broke at the hose bib last week and needed a repair kit = $19 which brings us up to a total of about: $325.

It would help so much if you felt comfortable with tossing a few (or a lot of) bucks at the project. Please use https://www.patreon.com/BoiseEliotNativeGrove to become a monthly Patron and/or make single donations through our PayPal account here: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/NativeGrovePDX

There are about 150 people on our email list at this time, so if each of you threw say $3-5 at us, we could cover these costs. If you want to give more or cover the entire cost, we’ll name the hose ramps after you, and sing your praises every time we water the Grove. On the other hand, if you are willing to set up a monthly payment with a shout-out and adopt-a-plant perks, click on the Patreon link here:  https://www.patreon.com/BoiseEliotNativeGrove

Our Patreon and PayPal launch has so far attracted ELEVEN brave contributors who will have trees, shrubberies, and bee-hotel rooms named after them!

We’ve met several of our goals with these pioneer patrons and as such will be able to 1) purchase new bee-straws for the bee hotel, 2) purchase supplies to fix the hexagonal bench and install the birdbath, and 3) help pay for the water to keep the trees and plants alive! As those first funds arrive, we’ll get those things on the schedule. Until then, keep spreading the word and saving the world.

Also! Please share these links and tell people about the Grove and come visit and take pictures and post them and tag us and just help people find out about us and enjoy this miraculous place we’ve created together.

Thanks as ever for your ongoing support, physically, emotionally, spiritually, financially, and psychically. We hope to see you soon in the Grove (all masked up) and in the World (safe and distanced), and in the Streets (don’t forget to Vote!)

Much Love,

Andrine & Howard

P.S. Full disclosure: we were able to borrow the funds to purchase the hose ramps, and we’d like to pay that back to the generous person who fronted us the funds.

Boise Eliot Native Grove

~300 N Ivy St  PDX OR

fb: BoiseEliotNativeGrove

ig: @BoiseEliotNativeGrove

https://www.nativegrovepdx.org/

ENA Board of Directors and Committees: Election Process and Responsibilities

Every year at the General Assembly Meeting on the third Monday in October, we have elections for the next year’s Board of Directors for the Eliot Neighborhood Association. The term starts in November and runs through October of the next year. Then, in November, the new board directors elect the officers. According to our bylaws, the officer positions include “Chair, Vice-Chair (or Co-Chairs), Recorder, Treasurer,  and if agreed upon, Newsletter Editor.” The bylaws can be found here on our website: https://eliotneighborhood.org/association/bylaws-and-policies/bylaws/

Other elected positions on the board are Community Outreach, the NECN (Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods) representative for Eliot, and Webmaster.

The Board of Directors’ responsibilities are few but very important to commit to. Directors are responsible for attending monthly board meetings (70% attendance or better desired) which are held on the 3rd Monday of each month from 6:30-8:30 pm. To be respectful of the board and guest speakers’ time, a director is expected to arrive at the meeting on time or to notify the Chair if an absence is unavoidable. They are asked to suggest topics for the board to discuss, read all minutes from the previous meeting before the current month’s meeting, and send any edits to the Recorder promptly.  Minutes from the prior month’s meeting are approved by a majority vote by a quorum of directors. Additionally, directors are asked to volunteer time at association organized events and help write letters to various organizations.

This is a working board, not just an advisory board and we are working together to make Eliot a great place to live and work. Volunteering on this board is a great opportunity to get to know more of your neighbors, learn about businesses in the neighborhood, work on issues facing the neighborhood, improve livability and also help to educate the residents about the history of Eliot.

In addition to board directors, we also have committees to join. These require no board meeting attendance  and their meetings are held at times determined by the specific committee. Currently, we have a Livability Committee which includes our Adopt-A-Block team, E-Act a committee working to get diesel trucks filtered to improve our air quality, the Land Use and Transportation Committee, and the Newsletter team. All of these committees need more members and other committees can be created as the need arises.

Our board is becoming more diverse each year and we hope to continue to include renters, homeowners, business representatives, students, and retirees. The beauty of Eliot is the tapestry of unique people that make up our neighborhood and we want you to be a part of the neighborhood association’s future.

Letter from the Co-Chair

As I went for a walk last night, I was breathing in wildfire smoke. These are not normal times. I keep hearing calls to vote, as if our problems are political in nature. Society is not what it once was. As someone who likes to host friends, I am finding myself struggling to maintain my social connections during the time of covid-19. 

I worry about our organization, the Eliot Neighborhood Association (ENA). Our roles in my time with the ENA have been:

  • To organize and put out the Eliot News (a huge task). 
  • To be a space to discuss neighborhood issues, development proposals, city projects and plans, and advocate for a better future
  • To put on annual events like a neighborhood cleanup
  • To be a resource for neighbors needing help navigating the city’s bureaucracy

Recently, our organization is feeling depleted. We have been continuing to meet over zoom, but we are not really able to have an easily accessible open door for a community space. As a result, we are not gaining members and seeing as much of the public as we normally would. Many of our members have stepped down from positions and committees, more than I have seen in my 10 years with the ENA. We need your help! 


These times are trying. The national political partisanship combined with a sense that things just are not being taken care of at a local or national level is wearing on many of us. Technology companies are getting better at keeping our attention on scrolling or watching movies and we aren’t going out and making as many connections in the world as we might otherwise. 

The most important connections we can make are with those around us. I have also found that during the pandemic, I am making stronger connections with my neighbors who live right next to me than I have ever had. These are the people who I’ll turn to first for help out if something goes wrong. I would encourage you to connect with those around you. The ENA has your back and is here for larger issues, but the easiest solutions come neighbor to neighbor. Spending more time at home has made me realize that I am blessed to live on a great block. You might find that you are too.

Eliot Neighborhood Association August 17, 2020 Meeting Minutes

Chairs: Jimmy Wilson & Allan Rudwick

Board Members Present:

  • Allan Rudwick
  • Jimmy Wilson
  • Jonathan Konkol
  • Jennifer Wilcox
  • Sue Stringer
  • Shireen Hasan

Others Present:

  • Harrison Osbourn, Dawson Park subcommittee
  • Thacher Schmid, independent journalist (ThacherSchmid.com)  thachmid@gmail.com.

Meeting opened at 6:35pm.

Welcome & Introductions

Dawson Park update

  • Allan has a draft of a letter that many of the neighbors have signed on to request speed bumps on Stanton Street
    • Jonathan introduced the motion to send the letter, Sue seconded, the motion passed
  • Sue spoke with an officer today who re-emphasized the importance of reporting every incident that happens.
  • Had one subcommittee meeting, may have another one next week. Have someone from the hospital that attended, a few other organizations have also expressed support.
  • The police are not protecting Stanton street.  Multiple police officers have reported they have been told not to police this area.
  • Action steps:
    • Harrison continue to reach out to the Mayor’s office each week
    • Reach out to someone from Chief Lovell’s office (Harrison will ask for a volunteer to do this)
    • Allan will send the letter to PBOT

Old Business/Updates: 

  • NECN: NECN is changing their model, shifting power to the PSAC.  Change is coming to the Neighborhood Associations. 
  • Land Use: Did not meet
  • Back to School Backpack giveaway: Cascadia is giving away backpacks filled with back to school supplies.  Will send the info to Sue to post on the website.
  • Emanuel church giving away food August 29th starting at noon
  • Saint Philip the Deacon giving away sack lunches on Saturdays.
    • There was a suggestion to do a once a month activity for the homeless across the street with food donations.  Had an event this past Sunday.
  • Community Cycling Center follow up: William has not been able to connect with Saint Philip the Deacon Church (Pastor Maria). Shireen will follow up.
  • It was suggested to have a list of community resources posted on the website: send info to Sue and she will post it
  • All the old minutes are up on the website.
  • Newsletter deadline September 1.  Has been harder to get content lately.

Minutes

Amended minutes from July meeting were approved.  Sue moved to accept the minutes as posted. Jonathan seconded. One abstention.  Motion carried.

Meeting ended 7:35

2020-10-12 Land Use Meeting

Agenda for October 12th, 2020

7:00-8:30 pm

Zoom Link

  1. 7:00 Open meeting, Welcome guests, Introductions (5 mins)
  2. 7:05 Discuss agenda and accept any additions (5)
  3. 7:10 Proposed Draft of the Historic Resources Code Project (60) 
  4. 8:10 Discuss upcoming projects and if we want to get involved (15)
  5. 7:25 Approve Minutes (5)

Please email lutcchair@eliotneighborhood.org if you have any issues with joining Zoom.